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Recommend Me A Whisky

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In the last year whisky has become my second or third favourite alcholic drink after lager or red wine.

Last Christmas I got a bottle of 10 year old single malt as part of my company Christmas bonus known as Macallan. Now, until then I was a Bells drinking pikey, and this stuff is like cream compared to Bells.

If I'm in a random bar I tend to go for a Jack Daniels because it's the only one you can rely on there being behind the bar if it's not your round.

Recommend me some more!

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Brother, it's ALL about the world famous Talisker, from the Isle of Skye. Smokey and aromatic, it is the finest Scotch Malt I have tried.

talisker.jpg

Talisker Single Malt Scotch 10 Year

color: deep gold

nose: slightly sweet, phenolic and sea loch - a big island aroma

body: full, well-balanced and round

palate: a robust, smooth balance of smoke, salt, spices, malt and wood

finish: long and deep. Peppery, peaty and salty, with a profound Hebridean depth and afterglow.

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There's loads of good whisky out there, stick to the single malts Laphroaig, Bruichladdich and Ardbeg are all nice. My favourite whisky is 16yr old Lagavulin but's its kind of pricey really.

My Uncle told me that after 10 years it really is diminishing returns, and not worth it unless you're out to impress other people.

My personal choice Lagavulin. Lovely, but if you don't like a peaty whisky then this is not the drink for you.

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Dude, forget being a gentleman. Whisky is about washing away the brazen taste of dead highland musk after a bout of wolf wrestling. And for that reason, once again, I'm all about the Talisker.

talisker_single_cask.jpg

Try it. Just find a bar that's selling it. Order yourself the Talisker. Get a wee jug of water for flavour-releasing purposes and sip. Take it straight, with no ice. Have your favourite lager on hand as your chaser.

Slainte!

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I try not to drink anything under 12 years old, they tend to be a lot smoother than young 'uns. Oban 14 y/o is magnificent, but there's the lovely Bunnahabhain (Boo-na-ha-ven) 12 y/o as well that I'm quite fond of. I could never drink Laphroaig tho, it's too peaty. Like drinking TCP!

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Jameson_Whiskey.jpg

He said Whisky, not piss in a bottle.

To be honest you've started with a favourite of mine in Macallan, but I would suggest looking out for any of the Islay malts which have a distinct peat-ish taste to them. Laphroaig as suggested by unspec is very nice.

For something a bit cheaper yet aslo nice you should maybe give Highland Park a try.

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As We Get It.

You'll have a canny night if you have a go on that little fella. You and a friend can get absolutely smashed on a single 70cl bottle of As We Get It (although I shouldn't really be recommending this sort of behaviour).

Tastes nice too.

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My Uncle told me that after 10 years it really is diminishing returns, and not worth it unless you're out to impress other people.

I don't know, I think the difference can be worth it for some whiskys.

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Soong, I think he meant nice whisky, i.e. anything better than Bells level. Jameson ain't that...

First person to recommend Jack Daniels gets it! :unsure:

I like Glenmorangie, which is very popular at the moment. Also: Glenlivet, Laphroaig, and Glenfiddich do curious whiskies which are aged in rum/sherry casks, giving them quite an odd, smooth flavour. Definitely worth trying. If you want to get technical about whisky, this is taken from a book I have about the subject - names will be distilleries:

Lowland

These malts are made south of the imaginary line drawn from Greenock on the west coast of Scotland to Dundee on the east. They tend to be lighter and softer and less heavily peated than some of the whiskies produced north of the Highland line. Names to note are: Auchentoshan, Bladnoch, Rosebank, Littlemill, Glenkinchie.

Highland

The highland malts are renowned for their strong character, their classic depth and idiosyncratic complexity. The majority of distilleries in the Highlands are located in rural surroundings, usually on the banks of streams and burns and more often than not surrounded by areas of great natural beauty. They fall naturally into the following sub-divisions:

Speyside

This is the heartlant of malt whisky distilling. Well over half of the country's distilleries are found here clustered around such rivers as the Findhorn, Lossie, Liver, Deveron, Fiddich, Dullan and the glorious Spey itself which runs a hundred miles from the wilds of Badenoch north to Spey Bay on the Moray coast. The greatest whiskies of all come from Speyside-Strathisla, Aultmore, Dufftown, MOrtlach, Glenfiddich, Glenlivet, Glenfarclas, Macallan, Aberlour, Balmenach, Cardhu, Knockando, Glen Grant, Tamdhu - the congregation of historic and distinguished malts is remarkable.

The North

A smaller roll call of great names here but they include Highland Park and Scapa on mainland Orkney, and the coastal distilleries of Glenmorangie, Pulteney, Balblair, Clynelish and Dalmore.

The East

Aberdeenshire was once a centre of feverish smuggling and around the eastern seaboard there are many distinguished malts: Glenarloch at Old Meldrum, Lochnagar near Balmoral, Fettercairn, Glendronach at Forgue, and the Glenglassaugh in Portsoy which is also famous for its marble.

The West

Onl a small handful of distilleries are left here of which Glengoyne, just 12 miles north of Glasgow, is the most notable. Oban is proud of its local distillery which was founded in the eighteenth century. Further north, Fort William has had a famous distillery called Ben Nevis since 1825. The islands of Mull, Jura, and Skye each have one distillery: Tobermory, Jura, and Talisker, respectively.

Islay

This windswept and often gale-lashed island due west of Glasgow produces some of the great classic malts. These 8 distilleries make whiskies which are remarkable for their pungency and their subtly-different flavour profiles. At the majestic end of the scale are the full and oily Laphroaig and the powerful peaty Lagavulin; at the other end are the lighter Bruichladdich and the delicate Bunnahabhainn.

Campbeltown

At one time there were just over 20 distilleries in this, the largest town in Kintyre. Its full-flavoured malts were in constant demand for blending with grain whiskies. Only two distilleries survive: Glen Scotia, which dates from 1832, and Springbank, which dates from 1828.

----

Phew, that took a while to type. That's a great summary of all the different distilleries/areas etc., so you can try whiskies according to area and taste the difference for yourself!

Just in case you don't know about tasting, plucked from my same little book...

Tasting

Although blended whiskies have been traditionally served on the rocks or mixed with soda water or ginger ale, malt whiskies deserve more sensitive treatment. Once whisky is bottled it does not go on maturing so there is nothing to be gained in "laying it down" as one would with port or claret. Malt whisky should be served at room temperature in a glass which will enable you to appreciate its colour and appraise its bouquet.

Some of the heavier more magisterial malts are best enjoyed in the manner of cognac or armagnac in an undiluted state as an after-dinner digestif. Others release their aromas willingly when a little spring water is added to the glass - not soda water or tap water but the purest spring or branch water you can obtain.

Ten Light Aperitif Malts

Bladnoch, Littlemill, Tobermory, Port Ellen, Glenkinichie, Deanston, Glenury-Royal, Glen Keith, Dalwhinnie, Teaninich.

Ten Weightier Digestif Malts

Aberlour, Convalmore, Dailuaine, Glendronach, Miltonduff, Dalmore, Glencadam, Speyburn, Auchroisk, Laphroaig.

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I also recommend trying armagnac by the way, it's a very interesting drink. Proper French stuff is very nice.

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I don't know, I think the difference can be worth it for some whiskys.

It was just his general opinion, and like most generalizations you're going to be able to point out exceptions.

Plus he did say it was diminishing returns, so there is no doubt there is an improvement. I suppose it's a personal preference if that improvement is worth the extra price.

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I enjoy my whiskey and always keep a couple of bottles of single malt in my cabinet. I currently have a bottle of Laphroaig and a bottle of Highland Park, as well as a bottle of single barrel Jack Daniel's, which is very different to normal JD. Oh, and for parties (and thefeore mixing) I have a bottle of Bells and a bottle of ordinary Jack Daniels. I quite like bourbon on occasion.

Hmmmm... I have a little too much whiskey in my drinks cabinet.

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Ah, Talisker was the nick of the guy I bought my XBox off! I didn't know if was a whiskey from Skye. (BTW, if you're ever in Mallaig, one of the best chippies I've ever been to is tucked away not far from the harbour there).

I've tried Laphroaig and enjoyed it - it seems to be popular here, so I'll bump it up my list a bit.

Paradigm: God damn, you know a lot of whiskeys. How old are you? I thought you were about my age, but now I have this mental image:

jackmain.jpg

:D

Impressive!

See, now I want to go up to Scotland again. I should have made this thread before I had holiday last week :)

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When I was in Tokyo the other month, me and my notably Gaijin squad were walking around the fish stalls in the Ueno market region. One cheeky Japanese fish dude scoped our pink faces and my vintage Scotland adidas tracksuit top and came out with "Ah, Scotrand! I have good furiend in Scotrand! Johnnie Walker!"

It was flipping awesome, especially seeing as how one of my team is from Kilmarnock. Oh how we laughed.

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Ah, Talisker was the nick of the guy I bought my XBox off! I didn't know if was a whiskey from Skye. (BTW, if you're ever in Mallaig, one of the best chippies I've ever been to is tucked away not far from the harbour there).

Indeed, indeed. I know Mallaig well. I've been going to Skye, on average, practically every year of my life. Most beautiful place on earth. I'm surprised you never realised there was a whisky distillery on the island. The Talisker distillery (in Talisker :D ) is a popular tourist attraction. In saying that, however, I've yet to check it out in all of my years visiting Skye. I've driven past it many times. I really should give it a wee swatch some day.

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Indeed, indeed. I know Mallaig well. I've been going to Skye, on average, practically every year of my life. Most beautiful place on earth. I'm surprised you never realised there was a whisky distillery on the island. The Talisker distillery (in Talisker :D ) is a popular tourist attraction. In saying that, however, I've yet to check it out in all of my years visiting Skye. I've driven past it many times. I really should give it a wee swatch some day.

Last time I was there was about ten years ago. I didn't have a great deal of interest in whiskey at the time :D I expect my dad brought some back though.

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Yeah man, it's gotta be the Talisker if you want it straight up. If you're looking for mixing it up with coke then you gotta go with Buffalo Trace mate, it's a belter of a Bourbon.

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Yeah man, it's gotta be the Talisker if you want it straight up.  If you're looking for mixing it up with coke then you gotta go with Buffalo Trace mate, it's a belter of a Bourbon.

so called because there's a trace of buffalo in it? :lol:

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