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ScouserInExile

Controversial Retro Opinions

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1 hour ago, Wiper said:

I feel a bit bad for arguing any point made in here (particularly as it's already being argued), but I'd also disagree with the "home consoles good, micros bad" perspective, to a point. 

 

I do agree that the ratio is different - the sheer volume of games put out for the micros means they do have an overwhelming amount of rubbish on them, even moreso than the consoles of the time. But in terms of games which still hold their quality I think they at the very least match their console brethren, albeit not necessarily in the same genres. 

 

The vast majority of computer platformers and run 'n' guns, for example, have aged awfully, particularly compared to the general quality of console games in those genres, 8- and 16-bit eras. But there's a wealth of puzzle, adventure, RPG and strategy games on the systems which hold up fantastically well, and overall there are at least as many home computer games I return to as console games, even if we choose to imagine that I suddenly like Mario and Zelda games.

 

I don't want to create a list of games, but as a brief example, the combined works of Bullfrog, Jeff Minter, Lucasfilm, Origin, Mike Singleton and Sensible Software provide a wealth of brilliant titles on their own (dropping Bullfrog and Sensi if we're only talking 8-bit). Not many great platformers between them, admittedly, but even sticking to that handful of "big names" we get a great set of games, and that's without recourse to the less prolific/less "reliable" developers. 

 

My point exactly

 

when you have an open platform like the microcomputers where absolutely anyone can make a game and self-publish a tape - of course the quality will be less. There is no gatekeeper of standards.

 

Nintendo had a huge advantage, in theory, of producing the carts themselves and of course taking a cut for the production. Far fewer games, with an element of "seal of quality". In reality, i think they just checked if the carts worked or had any game-breaking bugs/ crashes. It certainly didn't stop some absolute stinkers being released.

 

The NES had 700 releases, the Famicom had about 1000. There was a lot of crossover. Compared to the micros, its far fewer. The ZX Spectrum had 12,000 games released.

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Controversial retro opinion: scan lines and crt filters on emulators and modern retro consoles like the SNES mini are all rubbish and make the games look worse. I want my retro games looking pin sharp and pixelated, thank you very much, none of this blurry nonsense.

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14 minutes ago, dug said:

Controversial retro opinion: scan lines and crt filters on emulators and modern retro consoles like the SNES mini are all rubbish and make the games look worse. I want my retro games looking pin sharp and pixelated, thank you very much, none of this blurry nonsense.

 

I strongly agree with this. I do love the look of scan lines on specifically a CRT. They look great with their bloomed out edges and all that. 

On a flat panel display, absolutely no way to fake scan lines. Give me well scaled chunky pixels all day long. 

 

Fake scan lines just do not work on a flat panel, and darken the image. This doesn't happen at all with a CRT, as its basically the difference between staring at a row of light blubs where each odd numbered one is turned off vs. each odd numbered one is on but blacked out. If that makes sense. 

 

Fake scan lines would prob work on an OLED in saying that, but it would actually have to be HDR content. 

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Hybrid scanlines plus a small compensatory gamma boost on the Super NT/Mega SG looks great. I also think the Sharp Scanlines mode in Sonic Mania is very good.

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1 hour ago, Alexlotl said:

Hybrid scanlines plus a small compensatory gamma boost on the Super NT/Mega SG looks great. I also think the Sharp Scanlines mode in Sonic Mania is very good.

This

 

they look fantastic!

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7 hours ago, Qazimod said:

 

They're hit-and-miss for me. I wasn't keen on Sheep in Space or Hovver Bovver, I liked AMC and the Tempests, and Iridis Alpha is up in my top 10 all-time favourite games. :P 

 

It sort of goes with the territory really - for a developer who is frequently (unfairly) presented as though all he puts out are Tempest clones, Jeff's output - particularly his early work - is extremely eclectic. For me Gridrunner, Llamatron, Iridis Alpha and Revenge of the Mutant Camels are his real classics of the 80s (and Trip-a-Tron, but that's not a game), while Attack of the Mutant Camels and Hovver Bovver do nothing for me. But then they're all games of widely different styles, so that's no real surprise!

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Iridis Alpha, Voidrunner, Revenge II are my favourite Minter games of the era. I loved Batalyx back in the day too but haven't played that for a very, very long time.

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I always liked Llamatron on the Amiga. Thought it was a fun take on a decade-old arcade game, with its unashamedly retro-styled graphics, raw gameplay and offbeat design decisions. Sure, it was all rather bare-bones and not exactly original, but it was solid entertainment on the cheap. (Hang on, did Jeff Minter essentially create the precursor to today’s retro-styled indie games?!)

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