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Will alcohol pasteurise a raw egg?

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Each year in the run up to Christmas I spend a bunch of time looking at Eggnog recipes and then never bother making Eggnog. Because I'm just too busy lazy every year I never bother. 

 

Anyway I've found this video demonstrating an eggnog you make entirely in a blender but it uses a raw egg. 

 

 

 

I know you can buy pasteurised eggs in the US but they aren't a thing over here. Would the alcohol in the recipe be enough to pasteurise the egg or would I have to try and pasteurise them myself? 

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And as long as they're fresh.

 

My mother used to make me an old Norwegian dessert when I was a child: A raw egg and a spoon of sugar, 2 minutes in a blender. Creamy and tasty. 

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Yeah, I make whisky sours fairly often, a key ingredient in that cocktail is raw egg white. 

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I had no idea it was even POSSIBLE to pasteurise a raw egg without, you know, cooking the egg.

 

Wikipedia says it's a patented process that is only done by one company in the US:

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasteurized_eggs#Pasteurized_shell_eggs

 

Quote

According to the U.S. Department of Agriculture,

 

Shell eggs can be pasteurized by a processor if FDA accepted the process for the destruction of Salmonella. Pasteurized shell eggs are now available at some grocery stores and must be kept refrigerated to retain quality. The equipment to pasteurize shell eggs isn't available for home use, and it is very difficult to pasteurize shell eggs at home without cooking the contents of the egg. [2]

 

After pasteurization, the eggs are coated with food-grade wax to maintain freshness and prevent environmental contamination and stamped with a blue or red "P" in a circle to distinguish them from unpasteurized eggs.

 

 

As to whether the alcohol in a shot of spirits will sterilise any salmonella or other bugs that might be lurking in a normal raw egg, that's another question. I have no answer, but I've eaten plenty of raw eggs before and never had any adverse effects.

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On 02/12/2019 at 16:08, Horribleman said:

Why do you need to pasteurise it? You can safely eat almost all raw eggs in the UK, as long as they have the lion mark.

I guess I'm just a little wary of raw eggs as we all got years of warnings about raw egg being dangerous and bad. I guess the smart thing to do is just make the eggnog and let people know it's got raw egg in it so they can decide themselves if they want to try it. 

 

 

In hindsight this thread is a bit silly on my part as I've made mayonnaise in the past using raw eggs, naturally enough, and that's been fine.

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Edwina Curry was responsible for the raw egg scare iirc.

 

Pasteurisation is literally incredibly fast flash heating isn’t it? Alcohol would kill stuff via another means I think (intoxication? :D)


I think I remember that it’s contact between the shite on the outer shell after cracking and the contents that’s likely to infect stuff?

 

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What's for pudding ma!?

Raw egg and sugar.

Could I just have another Yorkshire?

You'll love it, it's an old Norwegian dessert.

It sounds disgusting ma.

You'll have it and like it.

But ma... Edwina...

Shut it! 

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On ‎07‎/‎12‎/‎2019 at 18:46, Blue said:

What's for pudding ma!?

Raw egg and sugar.

Could I just have another Yorkshire?

You'll love it, it's an old Norwegian dessert.

It sounds disgusting ma.

You'll have it and like it.

But ma... Edwina...

Shut it! 

 

What? ANOTHER Yorkshire? Surely you jest!

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Pasteurized eggs are horrifying. I’ve been making and drinking egg yolk and white drinks for a decade and have never known anyone to get sick. 

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Yeah, we make pisco sours and White Lady cocktails quite regularly, both use raw egg white and have never had a problem. Didn't even think concerns about raw eggs were still a thing really. You see all the fitness people putting them in smoothies all the time. 

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Has anyone tried some kind of egg white powder for cocktails?

 

Feels like a waste of an egg* sometimes** just to make a whisky / amaretto sour when all you really need it for is the foam. I've used aquafaba before and that did work great but I don't eat chickpeas that often.

 

But the thought of something that can just last in the cupboard forever, and just shake a bit of powder in with the rest seems very convenient. 

 

* Arguably a good sour is a fine use of an egg and never a waste.

 

** Sometimes I do have a real use for an egg yolk but not always. Sometimes I like to just eat a cooked egg yolk along side my sour

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There are three options that are shelf stable.

Fee Foamer, which is impossible to get in the UK

Ms. Better's Miraculous Foamer, which is ridiculously expensive
Soy Lecithin, which is a powder as you wanted, but you would probably want to mix it up with water for use in cocktails.

You could also drop in a little bit of pineapple juice, or honey, which are naturally foamy

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9 minutes ago, Gaz said:


You could also drop in a little bit of pineapple juice, or honey, which are naturally foamy

 

OHHHHHHH

 

That's actually a really good idea...we've got a pineapple that needs using. And we always have honey - we're adding sugar anyway (and often I just do a teaspoon as I'm too lazy to make syrup, which never works as well, but a blob of honey would do the trick.

 

other half prefers amaretto, I prefer bourbon, but I actually like a bit of both. Amaretto too much on its own. So I just experiment with balancing the two. But I started adding banana Bols to it, which has been good. I figure adding pineapple / honey is all part of the magic of mixing a sour and playing with flavours, all the better if it adds foam.

 

https://www.thewhiskyexchange.com/p/39251/ms-betters-bitters-miraculous-foamer

 

That's interesting. It's expensive, to be sure. That said, based on their recommendation of 3ml per drink, it's going to make just under 400 cocktails. Which isn't too bad (compared against the spirits I guess)

 

I mean, it's cheaper to get eggs and we always have them around the house. I'm not even having a problem getting eggs right now either. So I am not sure why I'm worrying about this!

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Sours are great without foam, too, but pisco sour is the king of egg white sours.

 

Try some rye too, I make a rye sour with quince syrup and aquafaba that's amazing. 

 

When you chop up your pineapple to get the juice, throw the rinds in a jar and make tepache, it's lovely for a sunny day 

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This guy has found aquafaba powder, and the video tells you how to make your own.

 

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On 07/05/2020 at 08:42, cowfields said:

Has anyone tried some kind of egg white powder for cocktails?

 

Feels like a waste of an egg* sometimes** just to make a whisky / amaretto sour when all you really need it for is the foam. I've used aquafaba before and that did work great but I don't eat chickpeas that often.

 

But the thought of something that can just last in the cupboard forever, and just shake a bit of powder in with the rest seems very convenient. 

 

* Arguably a good sour is a fine use of an egg and never a waste.

 

** Sometimes I do have a real use for an egg yolk but not always. Sometimes I like to just eat a cooked egg yolk along side my sour


Just use the white to make a sour, and use the yolk to make a flip later before bed. It doesn’t have to be an actual “flip” i.e. a designated flip recipe - I use yolk more or less interchangeably with heavy cream in drinks like brandy alexanders, for instance. 
 

Having made thousands of sours and fucked around with aquafaba and the fee foam etc I want to confidently say I believe that egg white is the king and anything else is second best. Pineapple juice is pretty good but can dissipate rapidly and then your drink tastes of pineapple which you don’t always want. Soy Lecithin is great and all but it’s way quicker and simpler to crack an egg. 
 

Pro tip: only use half the egg white in a standard-size drink. More than that is excessive 

 

I have actually been to Clyde Common a couple of times and chatted with Morgenthaler. I’ve been following his blog and buying his books for years, he is an absolute gent (and will chat with you if you message him on Instagram). A lot of techniques and recipes I’ve used, refined or developed have been based on blog entries he has written. Portland is such a fabulous city, my gf and I are planning on moving there soon. Northern Oregon is one of my favorite places in the states, highly recommend to everyone

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You are absolutely right, but sometimes you don't have an egg.

I splashed out on the Mrs Betters Foamer, because I was doing an order at Master of Malt, and I'm quite dissapointed with it. Maybe I need to work harder to emulsify it but it creates a sort of stiff foam that sits on top of the drink, it doesnt' feel like it's part of the drink.

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