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Jo jo rabbit - new Taika Waititi movie

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7 minutes ago, Chadruharazzeb said:

What exactly is this an adaptation of, seeing as it won the best adapted screenplay dildo? 

A book called Caging Skies. 

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I saw it a few weeks ago but never got round to posting about it. I liked it, and it stuck vividly with me for several days afterwards. But I had a similar reaction to when I saw The Death of Stalin at the cinema: there were so few people in the screening that I was self-conscious about ever laughing out loud at any of the black comedy.

 

Although it's had a positive reception in this thread, ratings from people I follow on Letterboxd have been very mixed:

 

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I don't think all the criticisms of it are missing the point. I've read some descriptions of its problems that I think are well-argued.

 

Here's Abigail Nussbaum's blog post on it - hard to choose specific sections to quote so I'd recommend reading it all:

https://wrongquestions.blogspot.com/2020/01/jojo-rabbit.html

 

Spoiler

However I can't agree with her when she says that the lingering shot of the hanging woman's shoes, combined with the focus on Rosie's distinctive shoes, makes it "so obvious what is going to happen to her, and how Jojo is going to find out about it, that the film becomes little more than a waiting game". Although it was likely that character probably wouldn't make it to the end of the film, the exact way Rosie's fate was revealed was very effective in taking me by surprise.

 


Part of Darren Mooney's critique involves a point that I've seen a few people make, that the film's picture of fascist radicalisation is misguided, and of limited relevance/applicability to today.

 

From his blog: https://them0vieblog.com/2019/11/28/non-review-review-jojo-rabbit/

Quote

This film is not aimed at the victims of resurgent white nationalism, nor as a critique of resurgent white nationalism. JoJo Rabbit has been branded an “anti-hate satire”, but it isn’t satirising anything. Instead, the target market for JoJo Rabbit is people like Rosie. It is for people watching their sons and relatives being radicalised and feeling powerless in the face of that, clinging to the hope that those relatives are still good people beneath the robes and the tiki torches.

 

It’s a staggeringly privileged and tone-deaf approach to the march of fascism, and one which feels particularly frustrating given the film’s charm and warmth. 

 

Worded slightly differently in his Letterboxd review: https://boxd.it/YOlxF

Quote

I think what puts me off about JoJo Rabbit is that it’s aimed at parents watching the radicalization of young white men. But treats those parents as the real victims of the ascent of modern fascism.

[...]

It’s a portrayal of fascism that elides the real victims, and which is more invested in the idea of redemption and civility than it is in actually trying to stop fascism or confront it in any meaningful way.
[...]
JoJo Rabbit seems to genuinely believe that the greatest tragedy of the Third Reich is that it robbed JoJo of a stereotypical idealised childhood. And while that might have been a tenable argument in 2014 or 2015, it’s awkward and uncomfortable in the context of 2019 or 2020.

 

He spun that point out into another piece of writing, linking it to Kylo Ren's arc in Star Wars:

https://them0vieblog.com/2020/01/07/so-your-son-is-a-nazi-modern-hollywoods-weird-fixation-on-feel-good-stories-about-fascists/

 

Quote

In fact, both The Rise of Skywalker and JoJo Rabbit seem to position their leads as victims rather than perpetrators. Ben Solo and JoJo Beltzer are confused young men who are exploited by sinister forces. JoJo Rabbit argues that its title character is too young to fully understand the horrors into which he has bought. The Rise of Skywalker suggests that Ben Solo was simply confused and vulnerable to Emperor Palpatine, who had been “every voice you have ever heard inside your head.” The argument is that these young boys cannot be held accountable for their moral choices. They are victims.

 

There is, of course, something slightly distasteful in all of this. While there is undoubtedly truth in the assertion that these young men are the victims of manipulation and brainwashing, this does not completely exculpate them. More than that, it does not give them a monopoly on the audience’s compassion. There’s a credible argument that sympathy might be better directed elsewhere.

 

 

Or more concisely:

 

 

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3 hours ago, Chadruharazzeb said:

What exactly is this an adaptation of, seeing as it won the best adapted screenplay dildo? 

 

I haven't seen this yet but, from reading around, it seems to be an adaptation of 'Mein Kampf'.

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On 11/02/2020 at 15:38, Mugman said:

Just on the way back from this and am really happy to see not only a thread full of people praising it, but also kicking the shit out of Bradshaw and Collin for simply not understanding what the film is going for; 
 

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Jojo Rabbit isn’t a Satire of Nazi Germany. It’s touted as an Anti-Hate Satire, not an Anti-Nazi Satire. The whole point of the thing is to ask the question “why would people hate?” In Jojo’s case it’s the uniforms, the friends, the glorification of the invincible leader who eats unicorns and jumps out of windows. Because he’s a ten year old boy and that's how you indoctrinate ten year old boys. 
 

When Robbie Collin says that the satire doesn’t work because everyone believes Jews have horns and are evil and that's ridiculous, he’s again missed the point. The reason Rebel Wilson is telling an audience of ten year olds that Jewish people can read minds etc can be seen in two ways. 
 

1. they are ten year olds and this is the kind of thing that will build them into hating. Jojo hasn’t learned to be the way he is just through posters; stimulus comes from a number of places. Look at parents telling their kids over the dinner table that “foreigners steal all our jobs” and “there’s no room in hospital because of all of the immigrants”, shit regurgitated that makes kids build these opinions over time. 
 

2. she’s representative of another way that this kind of thing spreads. Via stupidity. All of the stories she repeats are about members of her family but they always sound like retellings rather than things she's directly experienced. So maybe she’s thick, and gets told this nonsense by her father about cousins etc, then tells an audience full of ten year olds who believe it to be fact because it’s come “from an adult.” 

 

Sam Rockwell's character isn't a "stupid Nazi that takes away from how evil everything was" because the whole idea is that to ten year olds in Nazi Germany these people weren't evil. They were Mum's friend and the guy down at the Scout Hut and the source of all of these kid's information. The very things that colour who they are as people. It just so happens that the Scout Hut in question is teaching kids to hate Jewish people and throw Grenades. Then you add in that he's a closeted homosexual that's being forced to fight for the Nazis because what the fuck else is he going to do and it adds another layer to that person. 

 
 

 

 

 

Bradshaw on the other hand can go and sit on a big spike. It's clear from his review he's made no attempt to engage what's in front of him and has basically gone "No thank you" and written out the plot of the thing and not really formed any arguments. He's a terrible critic that's way out of touch with pretty much everything he comes into contact with. 

 

The fact that Bradshaw gave the last Star Wars film 4 stars and this movie 1 means he can eat a massive bag of dicks.

 

 

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I'm a fan of Taika Waititi, both his films and the guy's personality in general.

I was aware of the premise of the film, which I thought would make for some great satire and have had this on my watch list for a while. 

 

Saw it the other day, I absolutely adored it. Way more than I was expecting, it has to rank as one of the best films I've seen in a good while. 

Totally hilarious, and really affecting. I loved it. 5/5

 

I'm finding that film opinion now-a-days to really vary wildly and I basically can't really believe the 1 star reviews that some critics have given it. That really seems like a lot of the critics are completely tone-deaf and the satire of the film flew right over their heads. 

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I watched it again last night, loved it even more, and choked up even more. It’s just utterly magical. Even thinking about the end scene and its music track has me filling up.

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22 minutes ago, Delargey said:

Peter Bradshaw's review genuinely made me mad.

I'm genuinely baffled by how he's gotten away with his tone deaf on the surface spoiler stained prose for decades. I could understand it if he wrote reviews for middle England tories in the Daily Mail but The Guardian need to replace him with someone with their finger on the pulse, or just a pulse.

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4 hours ago, Chadruharazzeb said:

 

Fuck him.

 

(Not literally)

 

I'll fuck him then give him an unnecessaryly scathing review for his performance. 

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8 minutes ago, Delargey said:

 

I fuck him then give him an unnecessaryly scathing review for his performance. 

 

Put a spoiler warning on that! :quote:

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Brilliant movie, actually a lot better than I expected which is always nice. A lot of emotions wrapped in a easy to follow story 

 

It just perfectly tapped into that innocence of being young - which made the Facist brainwashing much more effective.

 

Loved it!

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I saw this a couple of days ago, and can only echo the praise. It's one of the best films I've seen in a while, and was funny, heartbreaking and life affirming all at the same time.

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I still just can not fathom the lukewarm to negative reviews that this film received. It's so bamboozling as it's easily one of the best I've seen of recent. 

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I can't think of a film in recent years that's got such lukewarm reviews but that's been so well received on here. I can understand the Peter Bradshaw review but I was very surprised to see Kermode and Robbie Collins didn't like it.

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I think this video on Jojo Rabbit and The Book Thief (book, not the film) touches on maybe the thing many film critics are hitting when they criticise it for not doing the holocaust properly, and that’s the distinction between stories about/involving Jewish people durning the holocaust and stories where the Jews are an object in the story but not people in it.  The author (person who created the video) explains it much better and it comes quite near the start:

 

 

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