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Do minigames add anything to a game?


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Personally, I'm sick of fishing mini games. There's just been too many in RPGs and adventure games over the years. I was relieved recently when DQXI didn't have one.

 

Speaking of which, I enjoyed the crafting stuff in DQXI. Always good to find a new recipe and then try to bash out a perfect specimen (so to speak).

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It’s annoying when you’re made to play them all to death in order to get something important or of good value as an item. FF X celestial stuff which included the most annoying chocobo racing ever having to get ridiculous results. And I did it but it was annoying. 

 

Ive played loads in the past though and got into them. Most recent was probably the board games in Assassins Creed 3 and also Black Flag which I’m playing right now, although I’ve not really touched them much in BF. There’s one I got into more than the rest and that was Nine Men’s Morris. My Romanian housemate at the time actually knew the rules as his grandma used to play it with him and he helped me win my first game. 

 

I liked the Breath of Fire 4 finishing game enough to get all the catches including the most comedy moment where you fish for a whale. That’s with a standard rod and hook. You do it in AC BF too but with spears. 

 

I do like those mini games that are genuine old games that can be replayed within a game. Fallout 4 was good with this because they included their own take on about 5 classics with their own Fallout Appearance. 

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2 hours ago, CovisGod said:

Did I dream it, actually the more I think about it the more ridiculous it sounds so I probably did, wasn't there a fighting game, can't even remember the format that if you completed it to the fullest you unlocked a bowling game?

 

The card game in Final Fantasy 9, Fishing in almost anything with fishing. 

Tekken Tag I think. Tekken 3 also had some stuff like that, a beachball fighting mode and a whole sidescrolling beat em up in there.

 

Namco used to love their mini-games and unlockable modes. 

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I've loved nearly all minigames i've played in games. I loved the Pro Evo football challenges like the free kicks, i loved the shooting challenges in Timesplitters and shooting range in Resident Evil 4. I loved the ones built into the adventure of the game, it was like additional fun attached, and breathed life and realism into the environments you visited, like with Ocarina of Time and Jet Force Gemini. The way hugely anticipated videogames were covered in the 90s with massive 6 page previews every 4 months they'd be these little blocks of info dotted around the page separate from the main text mentioning some cool innovative idea that's contained in the game. And Rare were in a league of their own in pumping their games with stuff like this, and minigames were a part of that. I think the game within a game thrill where it feels like you're digging deeper into the constructed world, GTA 3 was kind of built on that. I don't want to play a flight simulator but I'm going to dedicate a day to trying to fly the dodo and love every second of it. They expressed an enthusiasm to do more than merely make a game in the genre they're tackling and add so much personality because you know the designers only went to the effort because they wanted to and care about crafting something meticulous. I'm so easily pleased to be impressed by them. Rocket Robot on Wheels! That's another...you can make a roller coaster on the first level.

 

It's a bit different now. But instant arcadey fun, trial and error replayability can still hook me in, i haven't played Evil Within 2 but i did play a bit of the shooting range and within 5 minutes wanted to pause everything i was doing in my life to complete it. I wasn't really doing anything at the time and i gave up eventually.

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20 hours ago, RubberJohnny said:

This is based on me playing Yakuza 0 recently, that game has just endless minigames - Mahjong, Hanafuda, Fishing, Karaoke, Dancing, Pool, Darts, Scalextric, Outrun, Space Harrier, UFO catchers, Telephone dating, a Cabaret version of Root Beer Tapper, a Cookie Clicker style property management thing, like three different types of Combat Challenges, etc.

 

And yet, I didn't think they added anything to the experience.  I kind of gave them all an initial try, and saw them as a bit of a timesink that would give me some cash, but would detract from the time I have to spend actually getting on with the game and turned my nose up at them. It's a game about being a mafioso, playing Scalextric isn't really a part of the appeal, is it?

 

The last time I can remember getting into a minigame was Fishing in Ocarina of Time, which is probably also the only important one for being singlehandedly responsible for the prevalence of fishing as a side activity in gaming today, and that's from 1998.

 

Does anyone actually play minigames?

 

I think me and my mates spent more time playing fishing in OoT than the game proper.

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Part of my dislike of minigames comes from the fact that minigames used to be cool diversions, but now with mobile gaming the way it is, the need for small diverting games is much less. Mobile gaming does it much better.

 

also: fishing minigames are the worst. Stop with the fishing minigames. Please.

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Fishing is generally terrible because "wait for something to happen and react" isn't really fun. 

 

Actual dexterity stuff is often quite fun as sometimes I see it as quite "pure" gameplay. Just jump at the right time. Aim perfectly... That kind of thing. 

 

What I HATE though is often.... especially in things like Zelda... they're clogged by slow restarts. Repetitive dialogue, menus or micro cutscenes before you can try again when you fail. Just let people hammer at attempts and keep it pure. 

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Yes fishing minigames are a bad idea badly implemented. Real fishing is fun because it's relaxation in a nice place with something slow paced to focus on, maybe with a friend to chat to. True fishing games can be fun if they're really arcadey action games like those Sega ones. But fishing minigames are always just hoping for the pad to buzz and then bashing buttons only to get something completely pointless. 

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Mini games can be great - the Paradroid example above is spot on. But I have absolutely no tolerance for big budget, open world games rammed with unappealing  mini games you have to play for some story missions. Particularly when  the time and resource thrown st them should have been spent making the main game’s controls work decently.

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9 hours ago, deerokus said:

Real fishing is fun because it's relaxation in a nice place with something slow paced to focus on, maybe with a friend to chat to.

 

You just described fishing with a room full of mates in OoT.

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If nicely done, yes.  I'm particularly thinking of tavern games such as 

Fable - the one where you move a coin around a table in particular

Kingdom Come Deliverance - dice game

RDR2 - poker

Assassins Creed III - all of them were period pieces, arguably one of the best part of the game overall

Witcher 3 - Gwent

 

Fishing is so so, often fiddly rather than relaxing.

 

Blitzball - just NOOOOOO

 

 

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