Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Ketchup

Retro on a HDTV connection talk

Recommended Posts

There's a lot of talk in various threads how to connect your retro console to a modern Tv, but as it's spread apart it's difficult to know what solutions are available and what's good and not. Especially as more and more TVs are only offering HDMI connections.

 

So what is the difference between a framemeister and ossc? Are cheap hyperkin and the like HDMI leads worth it?

 

Is more expensive better or for casual gaming will cheaper options do? Put your experiences and thoughts here.

 

Be sure to mention the console you're using and if it causes any issues with certain games or TVs too.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The more you pay the better the look but to be honest lots of the cheaper options are fine.  People moan and groan about some of the PS2 HDMI and N64 Scart HDMI adaptors for around a fiver but I've never had a problem and think they look great.  Always best to look on Youtube for reviews for the model you see before buying, try and find the ones that show footage of the tV up close to give you an idea if it will suit you.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

They don't really look especially great, especially PS2 which doesn't output 480p very often. 

 

The OSSC has a great report from a good friend of mine but I haven't seen it myself yet. I trust him though, he knows his stuff. 

 

Ultimately, want kind of systems do you want to run? 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

the difference between a framemeister and an OSSC is about £200.

 

ahahahahaha!

 

seriously though, I just want to be able to connect old consoles, to the telly in the front room, in order to play the games. I cant see the point spending £160+extras to do it, when I've got a £25 upscaler and a couple of hyperkin cables for £50.

 

at least, not yet... Maybe when the games room is ready, and the setup is more permanent.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
23 minutes ago, Ketchup said:

So what is a framemeister and an ossc? What's the difference and pros and cons of each? Is there a need to have both? What about extra equipment that is needed?

 

They are both  upscalers, that take an old input like rgb scart from a retro console and output it to your hdtv via a hdmi cable.

 

New TVs don't have an rgb scart input, and older hdtvs that did had a crappy built in upscaler. That's why they are so useful if you don't want an old crt in your house.

 

They can also add scanlines and a few tricks to help get the best picture.

 

The biggest difference is the price! No need to get both.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The OSSC has next to zero additional input lag and handles 480p content well (unlike the Framemeister). It's also about the third of the price.

 

Another cheaper but high quality option worth considering is the Retrotink2X which line doubles like the OSSC (rather than upscale like the Framemeister) and can accept composite video (but not RGB). Some people like to combine an OSSC with a Retrotink2X allowing quite the spectrum of analogue signals to be laglessly displayed beautifully on a HDTV.

 

The Framemeister is pretty much overpriced and obsolete tech at this point.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have a Framemeister I'll be looking to offload in the new year, as I'm more than happy with my Analogue Super NT (and I'm assuming the forthcoming Mega SG will be of equal quality). Will probably list it here first.

 

Seriously though, if the main thing you want to play is SNES, I'd just get a Super NT rather than dicking about with scalers.

  • Upvote 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Having experimented a lot in this area since realising that my Samsung LE26R41B made the PS2 look horrible back in 2006, I'm a firm believer in getting what you pay for. The OSSC is something I've yet to try but over the years I've found the Framemeister (and previous XRGB units) to be perceptibly superior to cheaper solutions that I'd tried. I agree that the Framemeister appears to be almost obsolete now that the OSSC is available for much less and it'd be a tough sell for me these days if I was shopping around. An OSSC coupled with a decent SCART switch would be an attractive investment if you're starting to head down this path.

You should also watch My Life in Gaming's Youtube channel. Their videos on the Framemeister and alternatives are worth watching- a lot of the information presented can be found on other forums but they provide informative and very detailed summaries of a variety of approaches: https://www.youtube.com/results?search_query=my+life+in+gaming+framemeister

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, SeanR said:

before they were labelled I prefered the shit-scaler

 

 

what does that say about me?


It says that you have a preference, which is fine. The colours certainly look more vivid on the "shit scaler" in that video but the image is also noticeably softer and the whites are a bit too bright for my taste. It's hardly an exhaustive comparison (the uploader notes some defects perceptible in the YouTube-processed video that aren't present in the version they captured and I prefer to play without artificial scanlines) but if you're happy with the cheaper scaler for the price, that's okay. My personal preference says otherwise and my experience with the Framemeister doesn't really align with what's displayed here- but as I've said previously, it's a hard sell when the OSSC has come along since and provided a more than adequate (even preferable) alternative.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have the cheap one. The only disappointment was the PAL N64. No RGB, see? Only figured that out once id tried both of mine.

 

so id stuck with the CRT until now.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SeanR said:

I have the cheap one. The only disappointment was the PAL N64. No RGB, see? Only figured that out once id tried both of mine.

 

so id stuck with the CRT until now.


You could've stopped here, to be honest. ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

It arrived today and thankfully 5x mode works find on my TV. Coincidentally, I blew my US power supply hooking everything up, unrelated to the OSSC of course!

 

So I grabbed my Super Famicom and all is good.

 

I think my RGB cable isn't great, because the picture was over bright, but I can fix that.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
1 hour ago, SeanR said:

holy moley!

 

the pound PS2 HDMI link cable ALSO works on the PSone!

 

 

 

but it's out of stock...

 

Pound cables integrate terrible scaler chips which add a tonne of lag. They're arguably the worst products of their kind. Bullet dodged.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 minutes ago, Hello Goaty ♥ said:

I plugged my old Saturn into my Tv via scart and it automatically keeps jumping from 4:3 to 16:9  constantly. like in-out-in-out-in-out

whats wrong there?

 

That's weird and sounds to me like it could be a cable issue (where the signal integrity isn't solid) or maybe something to do with the telly settings or a combination of the two. Might be tricky to test without another cable / telly.

  • Upvote 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
31 minutes ago, Hello Goaty ♥ said:

I plugged my old Saturn into my Tv via scart and it automatically keeps jumping from 4:3 to 16:9  constantly. like in-out-in-out-in-out

whats wrong there?

 

https://assemblergames.com/threads/saturn-scart-quality-issues.30660/

 

Quote

Because the Saturn doesn't give the correct voltage on pin 8 (technically for 4:3 RGB it should be between 9.5V and 12V with just under 3V on pin 16, although the official pertitel standard has large gaps between the voltages and 2 to 5V is basically undefined...), the TV gets confused and tends to switch between normal and widescreen modes (hence the flickering when you do use composite sync), however most TVs do allow you to select between widescreen (16:9) and non widescreen (4:3) modes (overriding what the SCART input is asking), so press the ratio or widescreen button a few times and it should clear it. Some TVs will allow you to select default aspect ratio in setup, for example the Panasonic CRTs in allows you to select Auto, 4:3 or 16:9 for ratio, so by forcing it to be 4:3 it should stop flickering. 

Most TVs do tend to strip the composite sync from the composite video although I did notice that some if they are not getting the correct voltage on pin 8 (and/or 16) will see the composite video signal and assume it is composite video and the RGB lines are interfering with the composite signal.

It's not just the Saturn, the official Sony SCART lead on a Sony TV on the Playstation 1,2 or 3 will always select 16:9 mod

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Gamecube and PS2, basically anything 480i/p isn't that great on the OSSC. Not because of the picture, but no display I have will produce the pillarboxed 4:3 view that I can get with the SNES and N64. Still, an excuse to use the cable I paid £50 for which is now worth crazy money! I also found a Saurian RGB cable in my cache of retro goodness.

IMG_2883.thumb.jpeg.0dd93d254677547f0a2610491196cb95.jpeg

 

Loving Super Mario 64!

IMG_2880.thumb.jpeg.14eec18a7a224798c7dce16ab401972e.jpeg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×

Important Information

We have placed cookies on your device to help make this website better. You can adjust your cookie settings, otherwise we'll assume you're okay to continue. Use of this website is subject to our Privacy Policy, Terms of Use, and Guidelines.