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Tom Cruise commands you to turn off Motion Smoothing on your TV

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I just got a new TV and that shit was on by default. I recently watched a film at a friend's house for the first time in years. Luckily I'd seen the film three times already because I had to bottle up my despair throughout at how bad it looked, being a guest and all. It saddens me to think that all movies watched in that home are borko, especially when he should know better.

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9 hours ago, Sabreman said:

I just got a new TV and that shit was on by default. I recently watched a film at a friend's house for the first time in years. Luckily I'd seen the film three times already because I had to bottle up my despair throughout at how bad it looked, being a guest and all. It saddens me to think that all movies watched in that home are borko, especially when he should know better.

 

I just tell people guest or not. They need to know their TV can work better with some tweaking.

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Funnily enough, the first time I ever encountered motion smoothing was when my Wife's Uncle got a new TV and was showing it off and Tom Cruise starrer, 'The Firm' was playing on it. Everyone was ooh-ing and aah-ing at the new telly and heaping praise on it and I was aghast. Looked like Cruise and Hackman were guest starring in an episode of 'Eastenders'. His son eventually visited and fixed it, saving me the job but i'm constantly surprised at how many people can watch films that don't "look" cinematic or are even aware of the difference.

 

Anyway,  I liked 'Fallout' but think 'Rogue Nation' was better. 

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Interesting that McQuarrie presents it as objectively "bad". I mean, I loathe it but I know it's just because of associations of 24fps content vs 48fps. Is there any reason for thinking 24fps is actually better, other than conditioning?

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In my house, the PS4 is basically the only device we ever watch anything on. DVDs, Blu-Rays, Netflix, Amazon Video, .mp4 files on USB, whatever.

 

So the TV lives in Game mode, with every possible bit of processing turned off.


Doesn't everyone do that?

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Ah maybe I have this. My mate who's a video snob saw my tele and said he thought something weird/synthetic was going on trying to smooth stuff out and kept going on about it whilst his wife said how good the TV picture was (vs their 3 times as expensive one :lol:).

 

I've never noticed. In your face video snobs/Tom Cruise :)

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I played through one of the recent Tomb Raider games on my xbox with this switched on, and it made it look 60fps.

I know it strictly wasn't, but TR games generally have quite "spongey" input anyway, so it made no odds to the gameplay.

For TV and films, I really don't mind it.

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Is that why HD adverts in pubs look so trippy? Kind like everything is too sharp?

 

My friend was just telling me Tom Cruise moved a whole cast screening to a different cinema because he wasn't happy with something. Just left and marched everyone to another cinema!

 

 

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6 hours ago, Stigweard said:

I just tell people guest or not. They need to know their TV can work better with some tweaking.

The thing is, some people like it.

 

1 hour ago, Pob said:

Interesting that McQuarrie presents it as objectively "bad". I mean, I loathe it but I know it's just because of associations of 24fps content vs 48fps. Is there any reason for thinking 24fps is actually better, other than conditioning?

There's a stronger argument that native 48fps is better than 24fps than there is for frame-doubled 48fps being better than 24fps.

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1 hour ago, Pob said:

Interesting that McQuarrie presents it as objectively "bad". I mean, I loathe it but I know it's just because of associations of 24fps content vs 48fps. Is there any reason for thinking 24fps is actually better, other than conditioning?

 

In this case because it’s not a real 48fps, it’s interpolated (often to much more than 48fps) and the interpolation is usually not great. It’s getting better all the time but you can’t just make up two or three or four times as many frames (depending on the TV) from nothing.

 

Also films are shot with the use of techniques that help account for the low frame rate - most movies have a degree of motion blur that blends each together. If you watch Public Enemies, which was shot with a very wide shutter angle, you couldn’t tell it wasn’t shot on video.

 

Conversely some effects depend on a limited frame rate and being able to notice it. I can’t imagine how weird the opening of Saving Private Ryan (very narrow shutter angle) would look if you smoothed it. Martial arts films use lots of weird, frame at a time editing tricks to improve impact.

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Everything looks like it's sliding unnaturally around the screen.

 

I had to watch Hey Duggee once on a TV that hadn't had smoothing turned off and the effect made me feel quite ill.

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Public Enemies reminds me that this is of course a choice that a director should be free to make, but like edge enhancement and dynamic contrast and all that, if your TV is doing it you’re basically doing a cheap version of an effect the movie didn’t have for no particular reason.

 

Some people season their food before they taste it though, so I guess that’s just human nature.

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16 minutes ago, JPickford said:

I wish people would stop being snobby about optional settings.  It's like moaning about people who like their steaks cooked through.  Their choice.

 

I don’t think most people are choosing to do this though. That’s the one thing that really doesn’t make sense about these sets - they just start with everything switched on whether it makes sense or not.

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15 minutes ago, Alex W. said:

 

I don’t think most people are choosing to do this though. That’s the one thing that really doesn’t make sense about these sets - they just start with everything switched on whether it makes sense or not.

 

It makes sense to me because I think it looks better.  I suspect it sells more TVs in the showroom too.  

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1 minute ago, Mr. Gerbik said:

It's smoothing, not a higher framerate

 

It is a  higher framerate.  There are more frames per second. It's just that the extra frames are generated by a pretty convincing algorithm.  It works for me.

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When I got my TV, the first thing I watched was weird soap opera versions of Commando and Predator. As amusing as that might sound, I still had to try to convince myself that it looked better than the colossal CRT sitting abandoned at the tip.

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21 minutes ago, JPickford said:

 

It is a  higher framerate.  There are more frames per second. It's just that the extra frames are generated by a pretty convincing algorithm.  It works for me.

 

It's like listening to records at the wrong speed. 

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