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Nick R

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse - animated, non-MCU, written by half of Lord and Miller, and REALLY GOOD

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Going to say this is easily the best Spider-Man film so far. Dethroning Spider-Man 2 for me as one of the greatest superhero films ever made.

 

I’ve seen people quibble about the writing but what they get incredibly right with it is the tone of a Spider-Man story. Finally managing to move away from the pseudo Donner Superman tone they had going ever since Tobey Maguire’s first outing.

 

Instead, we get a film which owes just as much to hip-hop as it does to Spider-Man comics in establishing its mood. Something that winds up feeling both new and yet very familiar for the webslinger at the same time.

 

What helps with this is that the way the story is told, makes a familiar story feel fresh. Various detours are made for all the Spider-Men and Women to establish their backgrounds, creating something of a goal for Miles Morales to live up to.

 

Speaking of which. In terms of characterisation, this is pretty much the new gold standard for the genre.

 

5/5 

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People quibble about the writing, but it is very tight - while it's not ground breaking all the characters and motivations are rounded and has depth, we know why people act the way they do and what drives them.

 

It's the visuals that make this movie something special, and that's cool, it's still way better than most other superhero movies we get. If every movie had a decent script + a fantastic style/direction I'd be happy.

 

It captured every element needed for a Spider-man tale which is the most important thing.

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5 hours ago, HarMGM said:

I’ve seen people quibble about the writing but what they get incredibly right with it is the tone of a Spider-Man story. Finally managing to move away from the pseudo Donner Superman tone they had going ever since Tobey Maguire’s first outing.

 

Instead, we get a film which owes just as much to hip-hop as it does to Spider-Man comics in establishing its mood. Something that winds up feeling both new and yet very familiar for the webslinger at the same time.

 

So fucking yes, all of this. Finally a cinematic Spider-Man felt like a superhero from NYC.

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Before I forget, the soundtrack deserves some mad props as well. Great selection of songs and the orchestral score has some great themes. The one for Kingpin and Prowler stand out for me.

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17 hours ago, kerraig UK said:

 

and?

 

Cochese makes a good point, because Venom is unusual for being a character piece, with tons and tons of setup. 

 

Fair play, it's preposterously badly-written character development, but it's a significant proportion of the run time :)

 

As for Spidey, I'm going to watch it tomorrow as a belated birthday treat. Can't wait! 

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14 hours ago, Delargey said:

People quibble about the writing, but it is very tight - while it's not ground breaking all the characters and motivations are rounded and has depth, we know why people act the way they do and what drives them.

 

It's the visuals that make this movie something special, and that's cool, it's still way better than most other superhero movies we get. If every movie had a decent script + a fantastic style/direction I'd be happy.

 

It captured every element needed for a Spider-man tale which is the most important thing.

Except his uncle. I’ve still no idea what his motivations for siding with Kingpin were. Maybe I missed it.

 

It’s only a minor niggle though. I really enjoyed it and I totally agree about the visual style. It was brilliant.

 

I just don’t agree it’s a new standard in character development for superhero films. I think, as examples, the original Iron Man or First Avenger gave us just as good introductions.

 

Still it’s a solid film and it’s good that it’s had such a positive reception.

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8 minutes ago, JPL said:

 

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Except his uncle. I’ve still no idea what his motivations for siding with Kingpin were. Maybe I missed it.

 

Spoiler

Does there need to be motivation beyond he has a particular set of skills and Kingpin had use of a particular set of skills and paid a lot?

 

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25 minutes ago, JohnC said:
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Does there need to be motivation beyond he has a particular set of skills and Kingpin had use of a particular set of skills and paid a lot?

 

Not really, but when people are saying the character motivations have depth, then I think it’s fair to point out.

 

Like I said, I’m happy with what’s there, but I’m confused by people thinking it’s breaking new ground for superhero films. It’s obviously great, but it gives us absolutely nothing new with character development.

 

I sound like I’m moaning now, when I’m really not, so I’ll leave you all to it. Have a good Christmas!

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We know that Prowler and Miles' Dad used to go graff tagging when they were kids, and they both chose different paths, one a cop, the other becoming a criminal. So at least we have an idea of where he came from etc.

 

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2 hours ago, Treble said:

 

Cochese makes a good point, because Venom is unusual for being a character piece, with tons and tons of setup. 

 

Fair play, it's preposterously badly-written character development, but it's a significant proportion of the run time :)

 

As for Spidey, I'm going to watch it tomorrow as a belated birthday treat. Can't wait! 

 

Venom doesn't set up character. It sets up plot. It takes ages to get going but the characters are still wafer thin

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1 hour ago, JPL said:

Not really, but when people are saying the character motivations have depth, then I think it’s fair to point out.

 

Like I said, I’m happy with what’s there, but I’m confused by people thinking it’s breaking new ground for superhero films. It’s obviously great, but it gives us absolutely nothing new with character development.

 

I sound like I’m moaning now, when I’m really not, so I’ll leave you all to it. Have a good Christmas!

 

I hear you. It's not doing anything new, it's just doing it well 

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Watched this yesterday and thought it was absolutely brilliant. The first fight in the collider with Osborne was as close as I'd experienced a comic being translated into moving images. 40 minutes in and my son said this was the best film he'd ever seen. A great way to end the year. 

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I usually love audience participation (laughs, gasps etc) and am super tolerant of talking, phones and stuff (unlike outside cinema, go figure) but it bit me in the arse in the most savage way watching this movie, to the point where I don’t know if I’d have liked it had the three groups of braying nerds not been there. There’s a scene where they piss take Toby McGuire dancing where they first exploded into life and literally did. not. stop. for the entire duration. OK I know they weren’t putting it on, that’d be silly, but there was definitely the sense they wanted everyone to know they got every obscure reference and were just so fucking loud, not even sat anywhere near me. Was like the episode of Father Ted on the plane where the priest in sunglasses keeps barking randomly and he gets more and more annoyed. Getting angry again just thinking about it. Anyway, I hated it.

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‘Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse’ is a Superhero Movie About the Power of Art

 

https://www.slashfilm.com/spider-man-into-the-spider-verse-analysis/

 

spider-man-into-the-spider-verse-1-700x2

 

Quote

Miles Morales is an artist.

 

We’re introduced to the movie version of Miles (Shameik Moore) as he sits at a drawing table sketching a sword-wielding robot. On his way to school, he slaps custom sticker tags on street signs where he hopes his father, a police officer, won’t find them. When he wants to express the vastness of the shoes he has to fill — the “great expectations” of his elite schooling academy — he ventures underground with his uncle Aaron (Mahershala Ali) and creates ornate graffiti murals. His bedrooms, both at home and at school, are littered with an assortment of creative works, from a Chance the Rapper Coloring Book poster to piles of Spider-Man comics.

 

Spider-Man: Into the Spider-Verse is the world through Miles’ eyes, and it does tremendous justice to the story of creativity at its core. The expectations Miles fall short of soon shift from academia to super-heroics; the film follows suit. In nearly every scene, it layers comic-inspired motion and paneling to tell its story, not only paying stylistic homage to the source material, but framing Miles’ thoughts, feelings and even movements as he navigates coming-of-age.

 

...

 

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Spider-Verse, Spider-verse, 

A film to which I am not averse

Fighting Ock?

You'll need a nurse! 

Wilson Fisk? 

Even worse! 

Look ooooouuut, you're into the Spider-verse! 

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