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Wes Anderson's Isle of Dogs

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No, it's not a movie set in that London, but a stop motion animated feature about a boy in search of his dog in Japan. Due 20th April 2018. As usual, he's put together quite a cast.

 

 

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Hmm, doesn't look as funny as 'The Secret Life Of Pets'. Also, shame they couldn't afford proper CG and are using what look like old worn out puppets or something?

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17 hours ago, Capwn said:

Hmm, doesn't look as funny as 'The Secret Life Of Pets'. Also, shame they couldn't afford proper CG and are using what look like old worn out puppets or something?

 

I would put this at maybe 3rd in your top 3 Capwns this week? It's good, solid Capwning, a latter day Killers' single if not quite Mr Brightside. 

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Oh shit, my kid was watching the trailer for this on YouTube and asked if we could see it. He said "it has talking dogs and the people look like they are out of goat simulator" which I thought was pretty rum but wrote it off as some Dog vs. Cats style nonsense so I kind of fobbed him off "..someday...maybe... on Netflix".

Junior is going to find out Daddy's had a big old U-turn on the 'Isle of Dogs' front, now he knows it's some sort of ART.

 

But yeah, looks amazing. Mr. Fox was so great, expecting a similar standard here.

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Not watching anything I would rather go in fresh. I don't even want to see the trailer. I'm going to my local cinema for Rushmore tomorrow night, they're doing a Wes season to build up for this. 

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So, anyone getting hyped for this? I booked my ticket yesterday, going to see a preview on the 25th. When I went to see The Shape of Water the other day I was convinced there would be a trailer that I would try and ignore by closing my eyes and putting my fingers in my ears. Sure enough an animated dog came on the screen and I went oh no, put my hat over my eyes and stuck my fingers in my ears, turned out it was a brief jokey please turn your phone off using the character from the film. Unfortunately the theatre was still lit so everyone around me saw me do this and probably thought what a weirdo. Anyway, I'm hyped I love Wes.

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Saw a preview last night.

 

It’s fun and it looks amazing with some classic Anderson visual design. Those are the positives.

 

Aside from Chief, the characters are slight, and it ends up being quite muddled with a limp third act (which recycles a lot of the films earlier design work).

 

The whimsical humour isn’t quite as funny as it should be, the action is static (I had a similar complaint about FMF) and the plot is often silly in a way that undercuts the drama. It’s an odd fit that I imagine will bore and fly over a lot of kid’s  heads whilst simultaneously being too slight for adults. It also feels overlong in that it runs out of steam and the third act could quite easily be cut at the hour mark and replaced with that old Simpsons gag, “and then someone, let’s say Moe, rescues them”.

 

 So, I wasn’t convinced by it, but on an aesthetic level I enjoyed it.

 

I’d place it in the lower end of his output.

 

Which means you’ll all think it’s his best.:P

 

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Saw a review a couple of minutes ago.

 

Started out promising, brief and informative without giving away too many plot points.

 

But in the last sentence the reviewer blew it by gratuitously insulting his readership like a twat. 3/5 not as good as Rotten Tomatoes.

 

 

 

 

11 minutes ago, grindmouse said:

I’d place it in the lower end of his output.

 

Which means you’ll all think it’s his best.

 

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8 minutes ago, smac said:

Saw a review a couple of minutes ago.

 

Started out promising, brief and informative without giving away too many plot points.

 

But in the last sentence the reviewer blew it by gratuitously insulting his readership like a twat. 3/5 not as good as Rotten Tomatoes.

 

 

My opinions are considered contrarian and wrong round these parts. There was no insult to the readership intended.

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1 minute ago, grindmouse said:

my opinions are considered contrarian

 

Yeah, I had noticed that!

 

So a tongue in-cheek reference to that then? I'll amend my score to "4/5 would read again (a good capsule review)".

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I read an angryl article (or was it review?) in the Guardian about this today. Spent most of the time ranting about how it was using japanese tropes like sumo wrestlers and blossom trees with white washing voice actors.

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Quote

Another alarm bell: Anderson’s alternative Japan also ticks off a great many tourist cliches. There is sushi, sumo wrestlers, cherry blossoms, taiko drummers. When there’s an explosion at one point, it’s a mushroom cloud – a reminder that Japan suffered a nuclear attack, from a film-maker from the country that attacked them? Really?

 

And what to make of the fact that its cast includes alumni of famous Asian whitewashing scandals past? Tilda Swinton, AKA the race-lifted Ancient One from Marvel’s Doctor Strange movie; Scarlett Johansson, recently of the whitewashed Hollywood remake of anime classic Ghost in the Shell; and Bill Murray, Johansson’s co-star in Lost in Translation – a movie that found comedy in Japanese people being shorter than westerners and less able to pronounce their ‘r’s. And just to rub our noses in it, there’s a cameo from Fisher Stevens, the American who browned up to play an Indian character in Short Circuit.

 

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For Capwn; he goes on to say

 

'Some critics are barking “appropriation!” on Twitter and online, but where Ghost in the Shell and Doctor Strange (and there are many more) took a Japanese story and cut-and-pasted in white people, here Anderson engages with Japanese culture and references on an almost scholarly level, while the cast is filled with Japanese names, from Ken Watanabe to Yôjirô Noda, lead singer of Radwimps to, er, Yoko Ono.

 

Isle of Dogs is a movie that seems custom-made to set off appropriation dog whistles but, for all its questionable moves, the result is a story that’s one of a kind. If we police boundaries too strictly, we’re stifling the possibility of cross-fertilisation and invention. If you do it well enough, it’s not appropriation, it’s conversation.'

 

Which is what I thought too. The sushi preparation scene is probably my favourite in cinema history. It's so fucking satisfying. The visual style throughout was absolutely astonishing. So stylized and beautiful. Trash Island reminded me a lot of Machinarium and Amanita's other games, especially Samorost (free browser point and click game and worth a moment of your time).

 

image.thumb.png.e8bbd518ade9295ca6e8ce88a1f657dd.png 

 

All brown and greys.

 

The cinema I was in was packed - a few children too. I wonder how they found  it is a strange film, more so than Mr. Fox.

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2 hours ago, grindmouse said:

the action is static

 

I didn't feel this way at all. The fights are, which is intentional obviously, but the entire film in full of dramatic zooms, movement and cuts. It's wonderfully dynamic.

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17 minutes ago, Shoes said:

I didn't feel this way at all. The fights are, which is intentional obviously, but the entire film in full of dramatic zooms, movement and cuts. It's wonderfully dynamic.

 

The fights are static due to technical limitations, so you think at a scriptwriting level he’d avoid including 4-5 of them. In comparison to something like Ardman, I don’t think it was dynamic at all, but that’s partially a stylistic choice, with Anderson’s signature 2D framing, (which are as strong as ever here).

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