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On 17/03/2018 at 21:15, cubik said:

I'

I don't know, will I regret it like I did when I got rid of loads of records? Will CDs ever see the same kind of resurgence that vinyl has? Will I care?

 

Somebody talk me out of it please.

It's unlikely I would say, CDs aren't pleasant objects in the same way vinyl is. Horrible cheap, flimsy, dirt-attracting plastic cases, players aren't enjoyable to use, doesn't have that physical/ritual aspect that vinyl has.

 

 

You never know but man, even as someone who still buys BluRays, I don't miss owning cds.

 

(That said, they still massively outsell records afaik)

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So here are the CDs I've bought so far this year:

Gilgamesh/Egg - I do enjoy some 70s jazzy prog. The Egg album is from 1971 and is more conventional prog rock, Gilgamesh is on the jazzier side. Both feature Dave Stewart on keyboards (not the Eurythmics one).

The Orb - Rediscovered The Orb after going off them in the early 00s as it was all going a bit too boring and housey. I'd been after this maxi "single" for quite some time. I say "single" because it has a running time of over 70 minutes due to the main track being 39'58" long, the longest ever single, I believe. Obviously not to everyone's taste. Cost me £15.

Add in four CDs on the 12k label (minimal experimental electronic) and a CDr I got for free after buying a tape off Bandcamp.

 

A couple more CDs on their way to me. Generally I'm having a bit of a move about in my flat, got to rearrange the stereo setup. Looking forward to some listening sessions.

 

photostudio_1522068820326.jpg

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On 17/03/2018 at 21:15, cubik said:

I'm torn on my CD collection now - It got boxed up many years ago when we didn't have room for it or my hifi, but then a couple of years ago we moved and it came back into the limelight - I posted here a few times about it.

 

I boxed it up again over a year ago to decorate and haven't touched a CD since. I do use my turntable, but not digital physical media. It's all ripped and on my PC & NAS so I don't really miss it.

 

I'm >< this close to selling it, or at least most of it. I'm sure the majority will be worth 99p each (if I'm lucky) but I've got some decent collectables in there too (I think).

For now I'm doing nothing but I'm sorely temped to re-rip everything to FLAC or ALAC so I have lossless copies and then to have an eBay purge.

 

I don't know, will I regret it like I did when I got rid of loads of records? Will CDs ever see the same kind of resurgence that vinyl has? Will I care?

 

Somebody talk me out of it please.

I'm in a similar position. I love CDs (still buy them as my format of choice) but I just don't play them any more. They get ripped to mp3 and then shelved. Last week I boxed up all the albums and compilations that I know I really like and hid them away under the bed. I'm currently working my way through the rest, selling anything that's not all-killer-no-filler or albums that I bought more recently and therefore have no attachment to the physical product.

 

I do wish I had the time to re-rip everything lossless, but maintaining my current mp3 collection is time consuming enough - I don't think I could face doing it again! A lot of the old stuff was ripped at 192kbps. I've done my best to have everything at 320kbps in recent years. Still working my way slowly through the archives adding tags and album art to everything.

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Someone mentioned how part of vinyl's appeal is the ritual of taking the record, placing it on the turntable and laying the stylus on, seeing the disc rotate. And I'd agree that feels good. And I'd agree CDs just don't have that nice tactile feeling when putting them on. Add in the convenience of digital media, and how easy it is to rip a CD, or even not bother with a CD at all (Spotify) and the case for CDs is pretty weak.

 

Having a think about it now I feel I approach CDs and digital media differently. Things like Spotify and Youtube are great for when I want to hear that tune, or check out a new album or artist quickly. And MP3s tend to go on my portable player for the commute or whilst at work. CDs though are different, I like to dive into the collection and see what comes up, feel the memories associated with the music, it's difficult to put into words really. And sometimes yes I'll rip that CD and listen on the bus.

 

CDs will never have the cache of Vinyl, I'm finding it difficult to imagine someone in the future getting all nostalgic about them. Maybe we are in a transitional phase; I woldn't be surprised if CDs sales to people under 30 are really low. For me personally I'm taking advantage of this shift away from CDs, getting some great music really cheap. It's easier to store than vinyl, and at the moment I like having it around. But that's just me and I realise I'm going against the grain somewhat, fighting the tide. As long as I'm picking up decent music for cheap I'm happy.

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Can't beat browsing a big rack of CD spines for picking what to listen to, personally. No digital alternative has ever got that bit right. It's also a lot of the reason why I prefer jewel cases to digipacks (the others being CD safety, and ability to rejuvenate just by changing the case).

 

Being able to perfectly rip to digital is a killer feature of CDs, though! I use 256kbps VBR AAC, which I can't distinguish from the real thing, even with classical, but offers good size savings over lossless (which is just for backup, as far as I'm concerned).

 

In other news, cor, Heathen's good. Never know what to expect with late era Bowie, but this is up there with 1. Outside.

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I'm just as happy sitting and listening to a cd whilst reading the liner notes as I am doing the same with vinyl. I like browsing cd spines as much as I like browsing windows folders or iTunes playlists.  I don't fetishise formats, never have. I just want as much music as possible for my money, and buying used CDs is currently the best way to do it. 

 

I spunked nearly £100 on digital files (cleared all my wishlists on various sites) after getting some money and vouchers for my birthday recently. The music is mostly great, but it was all dead money I can never recoup. I sometimes wish there wasn't a choice. Music is worth the digital prices, but CD is often cheaper plus you can resell. An example, I ordered a cd from bandcamp for £7 +p&p. It came with a free immediate download. On the same page they were selling the digital only version for £12! It just does not make sense. 

 

I don't know what my point is. I almost envy kids growing up without physical media in their life. It would be simple. 

 

Here's my discogs profile, in case anybody wants to browse my collection or buy some CDs

 

https://www.discogs.com/user/acidbearboy

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24 minutes ago, acidbearboy said:

iI don't know what my point is. I almost envy kids growing up without physical media in their life. It would be simple. 
 

Digital-only is all about convenience and having access to vast amounts of stuff, I'm guessing. There is definitely a case for it, but like you I find the idea of spending money on stuff you can't resell a bad thing. Mind you, I have a Bandcamp page and people buy my music. However, I like to think of it more as someone showing their appreciation and supporting me with a donation rather than "buying" music. I feel the same when I buy stuff on Bandcamp, although like you I do tend to go for a physical version if possible. Maybe that's the difference, we've grown up with this notion of owning the music we buy, teenagers are more likely to think of paying for music in a different way, supporting artists or paying for access.

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I do take into account the "resale" value of owning something solid when buying music but I think I need to face the fact that the majority of CDs are worth pretty much bugger all these days.

 

It pains me to look at my now boxed collection of shedloads of CDs that cost me thousands of pounds, with few exceptions I bet most of them are worth 99p these days. Saying that, I've got my value out of the majority of them so have no regrets (except for a few stinkers like the third Cooper Temple Clause album) but I don't expect my collection to be something worth leaving to the grandkids.

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An article on The Quietus: Perfect Sound For A Little Longer: In Defence Of The CD

 

http://thequietus.com/articles/24710-cd-revival-vinyl-revival-cheap-cds-compact-discs

 

His conclusion echoes what @cubik wrote above:

 

Quote

I by no means believe that CDs will ever become collectable; in fact, they are probably worth as much today as they will ever be. Like the VHS and 8-track tapes of yore, you can expect to find them choking the bins at charity shops until the end of time alongside Mills & Boon paperbacks, Breville toasters, and Primark cardigans. But while there would seem to be no reasonable argument for collecting CDs for their monetary value, collecting them for their intrinsic value – for the music contained on them - remains a worthy endeavor.

 

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I've started to re-rip my collection in Flac format and was gearing up for a big clear out. I've been cataloguing them on discogs and have been amazed that some of them are worth 25p these days, if anything at all. The majority seem to make more money on postage then they do on the disc itself. 

 

Some of them still have the original price stickers on the front. Was £12.99, now worth 2% of the original price!

 

It's the march of time I guess, as a data storage method they're obsolete. As a memory of my life, they're worth more than that to me. 

 

Oh well, at those prices I'd rather stick them in the loft and forget about them. I can't be arsed dealing with muppets on eBay or discogs for pennies. 

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Should we have a 'what is currently spinning in your 2002 Ford Fiesta' thread?

 

Played this on the way to work this morning:

 

IMG_0474.thumb.JPG.ba7462c5d4e48e5ee983e84fd8a5483c.JPG

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On ‎05‎/‎06‎/‎2018 at 16:28, cubik said:

I've started to re-rip my collection in Flac format and was gearing up for a big clear out. I've been cataloguing them on discogs and have been amazed that some of them are worth 25p these days, if anything at all. The majority seem to make more money on postage then they do on the disc itself. 

 

Some of them still have the original price stickers on the front. Was £12.99, now worth 2% of the original price!

 

It's the march of time I guess, as a data storage method they're obsolete. As a memory of my life, they're worth more than that to me. 

 

Oh well, at those prices I'd rather stick them in the loft and forget about them. I can't be arsed dealing with muppets on eBay or discogs for pennies. 

Yeah I just looked on Discogs at the price of the superb Fuzzy Logic by Super Furry Animals, average price is 94p. I like to think someone is pick that up cheap and really enjoy it. That's the real value.

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Interesting article in The Guardian today in relation to whether CDs will ever become collectable:

 

https://www.theguardian.com/music/2018/aug/08/cds-resurgence-hipster-kryptonite-compact-discs-vinyl-format-music

 

A guy from Discogs was quoted as saying

Quote

"As someone who is always looking for new music, the overall lack of attention being paid to CDs means I can generally find a lot more of what I like without having to pay a premium.” -

bang on the money. I've got loads of CDs off Discogs which is especially good for slightly more obscure electronic/dance/experimental stuff, and the prices are, on the whole, a lot cheaper than eBay or Amazon Marketplace.

 

Quote

Though secondhand CD are an increasingly popular alternative to vinyl, their relative affordability also serves as a sign of their decline. Richard Farnell, the co-owner of Vinyl Exchange, a record shop in Manchester, says: “We still sell a lot of CDs but at much cheaper prices than five to 10 years ago. There is no evidence of a CD revival – the majority of newly opened record shops generally don’t even stock CDs.”

 

It's the truth we all acknowledge, but whilst we're getting fantastic albums for next to nothing, enjoy the decline.

 

Some cobblers about hipsters possibly wanting to get on board at some point - wouldn't be a Guardian article without it.

 

As I've said before, CDs are great for all manner of reasons. Streaming has its place but as someone who has grown up with CDs, and who doesn't have the space or funds to maintain a vinyl collection, CDs will always be my go-to format. And if the prices are low all the better. Better get in there before the hipsters take over.

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Yeah I work in a second hand/charity shop at weekends and our CDs are 50p each. They do sell because older people listen to them predominantly rather than any other format, but not very quickly. Even the more upmarket second hand shops like an Oxfam which specialises in books and vinyl and has a much more expansive and curated range sells them dirt cheap.

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CD will have its revival, but not for a couple more decades. CDs are still widely available new (in Supermarkets and HMV etc.) and used (in charity shops and online). Also, there are millions of releases on the format, many of which I imagine would be exclusive. Vinyl was dying in the 90s and now it's picked right up again. And if cassette can make a comeback, CD definitely can.

 

Saying that, I've had a Spotify sub for the past 6 weeks and haven't played a CD at all in that time. Still bought a few though 8-)

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27 minutes ago, deerokus said:

Yeah I work in a second hand/charity shop at weekends and our CDs are 50p each. They do sell because older people listen to them predominantly rather than any other format, but not very quickly. Even the more upmarket second hand shops like an Oxfam which specialises in books and vinyl and has a much more expansive and curated range sells them dirt cheap.

I love a charity shop dig, but 90% of the stock wherever I go is the same mainstream rock/pop albums and dance compilations, so it's little surprise that they sell slowly. Rarely do I find much that's of interest to me. Oxfam is probably the best but you pay a premium for anything half decent. I'd take a punt on anything vaguely interesting looking for 50p a pop. This week I bought Japanese classical albums from the 80s and some Latin Jazz comps.

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I've spent the last week doing the unenviable, slow task of ripping my CD collection. I've been checking ebay while doing so and 95% of them are worth precisely fuck all except oddly, 80's scottish rockers Big Country. I have about 8 cds, including 4 singles box sets that have sold for about £500 according to completed ebay sales. A CD released as late as 2005 sold for £70 on it's own!

 

On the other end of the spectrum, Field Day by Dag Nasty is worth about £30 and everything else out of my 200 cd collection (mainly UK and US punk) are pennies. Still it has been a great trip down memory lane flicking through the booklets, WTFing at old receipts and remembering loads of great times.

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Yeah CDs are pennies from charidee shops; if you're lucky, you'll hit one just after someone donates their weird collection. Otherwise it's a ton of KT Tunstall, Robbie Williams and Sugababes*

 

 

________

*Your charity shop may vary...

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