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I have a CD collection. It was beautifully maintained until about 2002, when I first got DSL. Then it somehow mysteriously tailed off, with a low recruitment rate. Then when I moved to NZ in 2008, it got put in a box and left in a loft, and I just bought stuff on iTunes or streamed. Since I came back last year, I've been trying to decide what to do with this frozen-in-amber cultural artefact.

This weekend I decided - I'm going to cut out the dead wood, then build it out again. Vinyl is too much like hard work, but I do like having something physical to represent my music, and I like to imagine my daughter might blow the dust off an old Bowie CD in 14 years time and learn a thing or two, in a way that she never would with streaming. I'm done globe-trotting, and my new house has enough space for a CD rack or five.

Combing the charity shops, market stalls and record fairs of York this weekend, I got 11 minty albums for £28, including some real gems - I think plenty of other people are just dumping their entire collections at the moment, so there are some uncommon lovelies out there.

Anyone else sticking with CDs? Anyone want to get rid of any?

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I'm planning on going through mine and getting rid of the shite while adding in some things I'd like but for whatever reason just never bought or never replaced from tape or didn't really know about - I'm only just listening to Beatles albums in full for the first time, and my one year old bloody loves them.

I did do it once before but sentimentality kicked in on a lot of it I think, hence a load of dismal middling 90's indie bollocks still remains and any gaps seem to have been filled in with some atrocious nonsense that my wife dug out from the depths of hell :hmm: Ruthlessness required, I think.

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I still attach value to the physical product, so but a lot of CDs still. Under £4.99 for a new digital release I'll probably get the mp3 (and 7digital have a lot at that price in launch week), but above that and I'll buy a cd instead for the extra inherent "value" I perceive, although it will mostly just be immediately ripped and never looked at again.

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I have nothing in my house to play a CD on anymore, well I'm sure something attatched to the TV will play a CD but I wouldn't listen to music through my TV speakers. Since Spotify I think I've bought one CD when I bought a new car and hadn't had my stereo fitted. I still can't bring myself to get rid of my old collection though, they are in the loft along with my DVD collection.

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I still prefer to buy CDs rather than digital downloads, even though I rarely play the discs once they've been ripped to my PC. Old CDs generally drop in price more than digital copies do. And even if it's a choice between a 320kpbs MP3 download for £4.99, or a new CD for £5.99, I'd get the CD.

I like having a collection of physical things, I like having accessories like liner notes available to me (even if I never look at them) - and yet I have no interest whatsoever in the expenditure and space required to start and play a vinyl collection.

I like having all my audio available in a high-quality source, that will be available to me even if my HDD and its backups go kaput.

And if I want to burn someone a CD copy of an album (which DOES SOMETIMES HAPPEN!), if I've still got the original source to copy it from, I can take the copy straight from the original. Whereas if I try to burn the copy from my MP3 files, I'd have to do lots of manual editing to ensure that the MP3-to-redbook conversion process won't introduce gaps between tracks that are meant to blend together. (One of the limitations of MP3 is that software and MP3 players can play them gaplessly, but as soon as you burn them to disc, tiny - but audible - gaps will be introduced.)

So for those reasons, CDs still suit me perfectly. Bought a couple from HMV yesterday, in fact!

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Catalogues maintained by people like Ace Records, Numero, Light In The Attic etc ensure that CDs have their place. Some of my favourite ever lumps of music have their definitive, sonically superior issues on CD. Sure, they may get ripped but often because legit mp3s for specific archival collections of music just don't exist anyway.

I think I've bought fewer than 10 mp3 files in my life, and in those cases it was because no physical version exists or would cost something ridiculous to obtain otherwise.

I stopped being ashamed of how many boxes of music I've been storing / transporting / periodically rediscovering a long time ago. I think it's incredible that there's a generation who have never wanted to own their own music.

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I still buy CDs. At first it was because I was paranoid that someone would break into my iTunes account and I'd lose all of my songs :rolleyes: but also I prefer browsing shelves and digging in crates to looking at "Recommended" lists online; I find that I'm more likely to make an impulse purchase in a store...

And all of the reasons Nick R said, thinking about it.

I do still buy online as well as instore; I ordered a few CDs from Amazon (yeah I know) recently and they offer free streamable and downloadable MP3 versions on certain CD purchases which is kind of useful for backups if the CD ever gets damaged. :)

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Crate digging is a big part of it - I'm enjoying scarcity again. I'm genuinely excited about what music I might find at the next car boot or charity shop. One of the happiest moments of my teenage music days was finding Pavement's first three albums in a second hand shop in Gloucester - I'd been trying to find them new for about a year, and they couldn't be got new for love or money in the days before Amazon's long-tail economy.

Scarcity, combined with the low price point, also makes you take a chance on things you're vaguely interested in, as you may never see them again. Very much enjoying a Finn Brothers album I picked up last weekend on this basis.

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Another CD-buyer here, although I have to point out I'm in my 40s and have been buying CDs since I got my first CD player in the early 90s. This is probably how some 40something bloke in 1988 felt about vinyl when faced with CDs, does that make me an one of those stubborn music buffer types? I hope not.

Mind you, the number of CDs I buy has dropped year on year. 10 eyars ago I bought more than 30 but so far this year I only have 6, and that's not likely to go up unless I got on a splurge, probably via eBay or Amazon Marketplace; you can get great stuff for next to nothing. The most I've paid for a CD in recent years was £18 for a copy of Son Of A Glitch by AtomTM, hard to get hold of but really wanted it.

Been buying more and more digitial stuff, mostly from Bandcamp, and like others I feel bad paying more than a fiver for a digital album, after all they don't have to produce the copy, it doesn't take up warehouse space or have to go through a distro chain where everyone needs to take their few pence.

And like others here I really do need to go through my CDs and get rid of some crap. Last time I did that was about 18 months ago, it was great going through and listening to some stuff that had been at the back of the shelving.

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I stopped being ashamed of how many boxes of music I've been storing / transporting / periodically rediscovering a long time ago. I think it's incredible that there's a generation who have never wanted to own their own music.

Horses for courses, I suppose, but the all-you-can-eat music rental services like Spotify really don't interest me. I'll rip my CDs and put them on my MP3 player (not an Apple one, it's one where you can just drag and drop music onto it, like it should be). I don't need an internet connection, I don't need to pay and pay, and my mobile provider won't spaz out when I listen to more than an hour of music a month.

Trouble is for most people Spotfiy et al is like radio you pick the music for, maybe you only want to hear that track now and never think of it again. Frankly that's what Youtube is for, although I wouldn't be surprised if that gets seriously nuked at some point. A shame as I like to find some obscure albums on YT to play whilst playing a game.

As far as the mainstream media is concerned, Spotify is the norm, and it saddens me a bit, but that's just me being a middle-aged git.

Douglas Adams said there were three types of technology: the stuff invented before you were born (has always been there), the stuff invented before you are 35 (really exciting) and the stuff invented after you're 35 (annoying and pointless).

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Horses for courses, I suppose, but the all-you-can-eat music rental services like Spotify really don't interest me. I'll rip my CDs and put them on my MP3 player (not an Apple one, it's one where you can just drag and drop music onto it, like it should be). I don't need an internet connection, I don't need to pay and pay, and my mobile provider won't spaz out when I listen to more than an hour of music a month.

Trouble is for most people Spotfiy et al is like radio you pick the music for, maybe you only want to hear that track now and never think of it again. Frankly that's what Youtube is for, although I wouldn't be surprised if that gets seriously nuked at some point. A shame as I like to find some obscure albums on YT to play whilst playing a game.

As far as the mainstream media is concerned, Spotify is the norm, and it saddens me a bit, but that's just me being a middle-aged git.

Douglas Adams said there were three types of technology: the stuff invented before you were born (has always been there), the stuff invented before you are 35 (really exciting) and the stuff invented after you're 35 (annoying and pointless).

I pay a tenner a month for Spotify, as it's great for music discovery - the natural complement to 6 Music for me. I hear a track I like, I jot down the artist, then go and explore their catalogue, whole albums at a time. If they make an impression, I either buy or keep streaming. Sometimes it leads me to wonderful discoveries; other times, it shows you how much the DJs know their job, as they've picked the one decent cut by that artist. Mind you, we have unrestricted wi-fi at work, which is where I listen to most of my music - if we didn't, I'd rely on the tunes stored on my iPhone (about 40 gigs worth, last count).

It is ephemeral, though - I cancelled it while I was between jobs after moving back from NZ, and was amazed to find that I didn't actually own any Kraftwerk albums, or the latest St Vincent. That's part of why I'm buying CDs again.

Weird thing about streaming economics - the artists whose albums I own and have ripped get more money if I listen to them on Spotify, than if I listen to my rips.

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Experimenting with eBay - just bought what is allegedly a "Very Good" copy of Hate by The Delgados (the only gap in my Delgados collection) for £1.66 delivered, which is absurd. We'll see if it's actually a damp beermat with HATE written on it in black felt-tip.

If it is legit, then this has fascinating implications for my quotidian economy. Buy lunch today, or take a pack-up and buy two CDs?

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I think it's incredible that there's a generation who have never wanted to own their own music.

"Owning" your music, and related things like the transferability of a collection, is interesting to think about.

Let's say someone owns a thousand albums on CD, and then dies. Those CDs would go to whoever inherits their stuff.

Now let's say someone owns a thousand albums on iTunes, and then dies. What happens?

[edit: genuine question, I honestly don't know. I'm not trying to sound clever by posting a question that I already know the answer to.]

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It's an interesting one, and one where the law hasn't quite caught up with reality. De facto, iTunes stuff has no DRM, so your son/daughter would just take copies of your files. Legally though, I don't think the license is transferrable, so you'd be in breach. The original purchaser's details are baked into the .M4As (no, really).

It would be a brave Apple/Amazon who tried to sue someone for inheriting their parents music catalogue, though. Now, trying to re-sell it after inheriting, that's another matter...

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I love owning physical copies. As with other comments, I'm of the age where I had to buy music (vinyl, cassette, CD, minidisc even) and it's sort of a habit.

At the moment though I've ripped everything at I own at 320k (sorry, not FLAC or other lossless) and have a really well organised iTunes library with everything tagged and decent quality album art. I use airplay to my Denon amps, or headphones to my phone which all sound great so I'm not concerned about originals from a quality point of view.

I still buy a lot of CDs, but like others, they get ripped and stored. I also have a spotify subscription and have done for years. They both have their place in my collection.

Virtually all my physical media (including vinyl which isn't ripped) is in the loft due to living in a smallish house.

We're hopefully moving soon to a larger house, and at that point it will all come out of storage, and be a proper accessible media collection again. At that point I think I'll buy a decent CD player as I got rid of my old Marantz CD52 mk2 years ago.

It won't be as convenient as my PC, or even sound any better, but for some reason it feels better. Stick a CD on, and not worry about playlists or a gazillion available songs on spotify. Just sit back and enjoy the music.

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Braved a bad weather forecast and went crate digging at the car boot.

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The Dylan is for my mum, who has always regretted selling her vinyl of this in the 70's. The Can album is a shot in the dark - huge influence on Pavement and others apparently, so worth a pop. Chuffed with the Iggy album - his Berlin records are excellent.

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My eBay experiments have borne fruit:

post-490-0-74838700-1435300925.jpg

Hate was, as mentioned, £1.66 delivered, and it seems to be pristine, which is insane.

The Kraftwerk and CAN were £4 each (gasp!), but worth it for the original mix Kraftwerk albums, rather than the slightly George Lucas-ed remasters.

Any Krautrock tips beyond the Kraftwerk/CAN/Neu! triumvirate?

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I used to buy loads of cds and stopped around 2010 when i felt like the labels weren't making any effort anymore. I'd pay a tenner and get a cd in some wafer thin digipack, no book, no lyrics or liner notes, sometimes you'd get a tiny picture of the band, that was it. Then to add insult to injury if you bought the digital version for half the price, you'd get some extra tracks as well.

Anyone who releases an album with itunes -exclusive tracks is abhorrent and I have no problem torrenting that shit. Having to buy more than one digital copy of an album to get all the tracks is a proper piss take

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I used to buy loads of cds and stopped around 2010 when i felt like the labels weren't making any effort anymore. I'd pay a tenner and get a cd in some wafer thin digipack, no book, no lyrics or liner notes, sometimes you'd get a tiny picture of the band, that was it. Then to add insult to injury if you bought the digital version for half the price, you'd get some extra tracks as well.

Anyone who releases an album with itunes -exclusive tracks is abhorrent and I have no problem torrenting that shit. Having to buy more than one digital copy of an album to get all the tracks is a proper piss take

Funny, I hate bonus tracks. If the band has put some effort into shaping a track listing, there's nothing that buggers it up more than some half-baked B-Side (or god forbid, a remix) stuck on the end. I invariably remove them, then get iTunes moaning at me that I don't have the full album.

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Funny, I hate bonus tracks. If the band has put some effort into shaping a track listing, there's nothing that buggers it up more than some half-baked B-Side (or god forbid, a remix) stuck on the end. I invariably remove them, then get iTunes moaning at me that I don't have the full album.

Fair enough, but sometimes it's the other way and the bonus track is one of the best songs on the record, like this one

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