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KartoffelKopf

How Videogames Changed the World - Brooker

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Overall I found it a very enjoyable watch. The list overall was very good at showing key milestones.

The twitter comparisons at the end were a bit mystifying to me, they sounded more like a fanciful idea Brooker had been turning over in his head for a while and then cobbled together although I can sort of see where he's coming from.

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The show's problem, really, is that it's not really aimed at me. Yes me, not you, I don't care about you. Me.

So when it starts talking about Papers, Please, and raising the subject of how games can be an excellent medium for conveying perspective by literally changing yours from an onlooker to a participant, I really wanted it to go into depth. I wanted to hear from the developer, or from people outside gaming commenting on their value in this respect. I want to see a documentary about a particular aspect of games. Here, there was no time for that.

Brooker mentioned in his Guardian interview that there's a problem getting stuff commissioned - if you're lucky enough to get someone to greenlight a show about games in the first place, trying to pitch it as something only intelligible to people already clued up in the "language of games" is likely to get a swift rebuttal.

And that's the real shame. With Screenwipe and Newswipe, there were often interesting takes on what news and TV were doing and why they were doing it. With Gameswipe and this, we're still kinda at the point where they're explaining what gaming is. I would normally hope at this point that the show gets good ratings and there's hope for something a little more specialised... but then, Gameswipe got better figures than the other Wipes, and we've had nothing. From anyone.

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Once again it's a history of video games - please let us not have to endure that sort of thing again.

Why do we have to constantly explain to people who don't play games games by going on about fucking Space Invaders and Pac Man?

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So when it starts talking about Papers, Please, and raising the subject of how games can be an excellent medium for conveying perspective by literally changing yours from an onlooker to a participant, I really wanted it to go into depth. I wanted to hear from the developer, or from people outside gaming commenting on their value in this respect. I want to see a documentary about a particular aspect of games. Here, there was no time for that.

http://forums.tigsource.com/index.php?topic=29750.0

Read this thread, it's the dev diary for Papers, Please and absolutely fascinating.

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Once again it's a history of video games - please let us not have to endure that sort of thing again.

Why do we have to constantly explain to people who don't play games games by going on about fucking Space Invaders and Pac Man?

It's really disappointing to hear that its yet another example of this tired genre. It's particularly frustrating because I thought Brooker had said they were trying to avoid the problems in this format.

The problem here is that no-one is willing to produce a tv show about games for gamers. The medium (in terms of its relation to TV) only has any cultural validity and commercial feasibility when its offered up as something for non-gamers to deign with their attention.

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The twitter comparisons at the end were a bit mystifying to me, they sounded more like a fanciful idea Brooker had been turning over in his head for a while and then cobbled together although I can sort of see where he's coming from.

It wouldn't have been out of place in a Barry Shitpeas segment:

1. Old videogames have like high scores that go up when you're winning.

2. Twitter has numbers, and it's like on a computer and stuff with graphics.

3. Twitter is a videogame.

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Yeah it was deeply average. Nothing we didn't already know, and the usual raft of commentators regurgitating their briefing notes. Though one of his "your mum" gags made me laugh.

Still, it was two hours that I'd have better spent playing games.

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It was all right.

I think there some games that were missed.

Final Fantasy VII - The first Final Fantasy that was released in Europe and a certain spoiler has become one of the biggest moments in video games. I wasn't really surprised Final Fantasy wasn't mentioned but Final Fantasy VII's impact for the genre and the franchise itself is huge. Even casual gamers who would know nothing about any other JRPG would have probably at least have heard of Final Fantasy.

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time - I was surprised how little Zelda was mentioned. This game is arguably considered the best game that has ever been made, so how could that have been missed out?

Metal Gear Solid - A game that played the player. A story driven stealth game with some unique 4th wall breaking puzzles. Solid Snake and Campbell's cry "Snake! SNAAAAKE!" have become iconic.

Pokemon - I can't believe this one was missed. Pokemon was everywhere when I was a kid. People bringing their Game Boys into school to battle, trade etc. Still massively popular today with a TV series still going, trading cards, many movies.

Mass Effect - Although mentioned for characters having non-linear relationship choices I think it deserved more. Unfortunately the ending to Mass Effect 3 has soured a lot of peoples opinions but Mass Effect was one of the biggest new franchises of the last generation. I read somewhere that overall there is about 1000 unique choices over the course of the 3 games.

Also, I hope everyone had played Shadow of the Colossus before watching this because there was some spoilers about it.

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I seen Rab Florence post this on Twitter.

"Nice job C4 on that big videogame slot. Will the BBC respond next year? With something regular? I think it's likely. :-)"

To be honest even if it was a little more casual I would still watch it. I watch the Blurb on Challenge since I think it's the only gaming related show on TV.

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I liked it, even if it was hardly filled with revelations for anyone who's already deeply into video games (and I did like the segue into the joys of 'gamification' via Twitter at the end, rushed though it was). Perhaps more importantly, my completely-not-interested-in-computer-games girlfriend really enjoyed it. Yes, it was lightweight, and yes it would be lovely to see something more in-depth, but as a one-off it was never going to be able to achieve anything more, and as a brief overview of the breadth and development of gaming over time, it was entirely successful. The sort of thing that Jon Snow should have been shown to give him a basic level of understanding of the medium before his cringe-worthy talk with Brooker, in fact.

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It was all right.

I think there some games that were missed.

Final Fantasy VII

The Legend of Zelda: Ocarina of Time

Metal Gear Solid

Mass Effect

I think you have to understand the criteria for his list. Each game had to have an unmistakable effect on the world outside of videogames. Pong showing people their TVs could be interactive, Pac-Man fever, all those parents who named their babies Mario in the 1980s, girls given a kick-ass role-model in Lara Croft, scapegoating and moral panic caused by Mortal Kombat and Doom, families and casual gamers getting on board with Wii and Kinect, Minecraft helping autistic children, etc.

The games you listed above are great genre-defining games within the medium, but only gamers who appreciate the medium would understand why they are important. Do non-gamers remember any fever gripping the nation caused by FFVII or Metal Gear Solid?

I'd say there's a case for Pokemon, possibly.

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What affect did the Secret of Monkey Island have? A few months ago people were asking me what game I was playing. When I told them "the Secret of Monkey Island" I just got confused looks. And these people were more than just casual gamers ages ranging from 18 to mid 30s. If these people that play games had no idea about Monkey Island, then what about the casual gamer?

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Anyone else think Rab's segments were a bit...shit?

Even my sister who knows nothing about games, walked in the room during the segment on Tetris and proclaimed "Well thats fucking obvious" to Mr Florence on screen.

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