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Rudderless

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  1. Because it's true. Look, I thought the camera was a delight for the most part. I fully understood the value of using it as part of controlling Mario. But there are moments in Sunshine where you either don't have full control because of the level geometry, or it adjusts itself to give you a terrible view of the action. It happens in the interior hotel sections, but it's never as much of a pain as it is on that one particular Shine. Sunshine is still a really good game! But it also has at least three of the worst bits of any 3D Mario game.
  2. I have a huge soft spot for Sunshine, since it was the GameCube that really got me back into games in a big way, but it is almost certainly the least best game on this list. But it's not, by any measure, a bad game. Yes, it has bad moments - the hotel levels aren't great, the behind-the-rollercoaster platforming bit on Pinna Park is ruined by the camera, the leaf-boat bit is one of the worst things Nintendo's ever done, and the pachinko stage - well, that can fuck right off. But I will fight for Delfino Plaza to be recognised as Mario's best hub world ever - it's just a joyous, sunny, happy little tropical playground, and it's here where you really see the genius of FLUDD. As good as Mario's movement is in Odyssey, I can't pretend I don't miss spraying water and sliding around on my belly, or scudding across the sea at ridiculous speeds, as with the jet nozzle. As someone who was late to the party with Mario 64 (I played it after Sunshine, again on DS, and again via Virtual Console) I honestly think almost every subsequent Mario game has bettered it. Yes, it's the most important game of the lot. Yes, it still holds up remarkably well, all things considered. But it's not pretty, it's downright clunky in places (and understandably so - Nintendo was new to 3D worlds, and had plenty to learn) and it just doesn't *feel* as good as subsequent Mario games. I completely understand why some prefer its sandboxes to Galaxy's more compact worlds, but in every other sense I find it hard to make a case for 64 over Galaxy and its sequel. I've cooled on Odyssey ever so slightly after hitting 999 Moons - I still think it's an amazing game, but while I think Mario has never felt better to control, I've not felt quite the same desire to immediately replay it. I guess that's partly a result of the structure - doesn't lend itself quite so well to repeat visits, even if the first time through lasts a good deal longer. So I'd probably put Galaxy at the top. Its sequel is still great, but felt marginally less special at the time because it wasn't as fresh - it's basically the best expansion pack ever made. 3D World is lovely and hugely underrated, but suffers slightly from its level design having to cater for one and four players at the same time. 3D Land has slowly grown in my affections, and the stereoscopic 3D is brilliant, but it takes a bit too long to hit its stride, and feels (necessarily) compact in a way the console games don't. So the top two for me are easy - Galaxy, and then Odyssey - and then the rest are basically all vying for third spot. But essentially it's tiny differences between the seven best 3D platformers ever made. For me, no other series has ever come close.
  3. Christ knows I've read some stupid things on the internet. This is right up there with the dumbest of the lot.
  4. Inside No.9

    Yep, a nice way to round off probably the best series to date. Good to know it's definitely coming back for a fifth, too.
  5. Well, it's not good, but I absolve the actors of any blame. Gugu Mbatha-Raw in particular does a lot with very little (and is obviously destined for much, much better). Although the moments of levity are often woefully misplaced, Chris O'Dowd does manage to make the few funny lines land, if only because he's essentially playing Roy in space. I mean, his final act basically involves turning something off and on again. But yes, none of it makes a lick of sense. It doesn't so much have plot holes as plot chasms, the Earth scenes are quite obviously shoehorned in and amount to absolutely nothing of any worth, the direction is woefully flat, every moment of peril is glaringly signposted, and the final shot is just *blows raspberry* There are tiny, fleeting hints of a better film buried in there. A fine cast keeps it just about watchable. But if I'd paid to see that at the cinema I'd be throwing popcorn at the screen and jeering by the end.
  6. Shadow of the Colossus Remake (Bluepoint)

    Would like to second this, it's a terrific piece.
  7. Shadow of the Colossus Remake (Bluepoint)

    Well, I did watch the above video which illustrates the differences. I dunno, this mostly looks a bit overcast, where the original had this almost magical aura to it with the way the light seemed to pierce the gloom - perhaps partly borne of technical limitations, sure, but for my money there's a definite difference. I guess what I'm saying is that it doesn't *quite* look like a Ueda game anymore. It doesn't *quite* seem to belong to the same lineage. It's not far off - like I say, there's just something uncanny about it. It's the same game, but also...not.
  8. Shadow of the Colossus Remake (Bluepoint)

    Speaking as someone who loved the original and replayed it on PS3, there's just something ever-so-slightly 'off' for me about the way this looks, something uncanny somehow. To my eyes the smoothness of the frame-rate doesn't *quite* fit with the animation, and while the voiceover in that video suggests they've recaptured the look of the original, the lighting doesn't quite have that same ethereal feel to it. The bloom might have been overused before, but it lent the game a certain otherworldly quality that this remake doesn't capture in quite the same way (though the PS3 remake did). I'm hoping I'll feel differently when I play it. It's clearly a technically accomplished remake, crafted with genuine care. I dunno. Someone tell me I'm not going completely mad.
  9. Celeste - next game from Towerfall devs - Switch/PS4/PC

    You use the momentum of the moving platform. Jump off at the right time and it propels you further.
  10. Inside No.9

    I think it was simply that
  11. Monster Hunter: World

    Yep. It's probably easier to solo, too, not least since you can't all play the same story assignment together unless you've all watched its main cutscene. You're better off finishing the story missions alone and doing optional quests with a full party.
  12. Celeste - next game from Towerfall devs - Switch/PS4/PC

    Only played it on PC, I'm afraid. Might double-dip but only after I've sorted my tax - hopefully someone else can take one for the team and let us know if it holds up (I can't see why it wouldn't, mind).
  13. Monster Hunter: World

    This isn't a garbage Monster Hunter game by any stretch of the imagination.
  14. Celeste - next game from Towerfall devs - Switch/PS4/PC

    Restarts are really quick, and any individual challenge is rarely more than a screen or two long. It's hard, yeah, but it's forgiving. If you fuck up, you're not getting put back far at all, and that stops it from getting frustrating. And yeah, you can add invulnerability, infinite air-dashes or slow it down to half-speed if you're struggling. It encourages you not to, but it's not about to forbid you from seeing how it ends if your reactions aren't what they were. The B-side remixes can get to fuck, mind.
  15. ARMS - Version 5.0 Dr. Coyle

    I never really know when I'm going to be busy with work or family stuff, but I'll make the effort to show up for this if it goes ahead.
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