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Anne Summers

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Everything posted by Anne Summers

  1. I was never a regular watcher but I just happened to turn it on one time and saw PJ or Duncan get splattered in the face with a paintball. Little did I know I'd just watched something that would become a classic moment of children's TV drama that people would remember for decades to come.
  2. I've watched those videos and now understand a tiny amount about Roblox. My opinion is still that video game makers have always built their business model on exploiting children, getting them hooked on their products and parting them from their money (or nagging their parents for money that they can be parted from). At least Roblox (and Minecraft, Fortnite etc) encourages creativity, which the games we grew up with basically never did. I used to dream about accessible, user-friendly tools that would let me build my own games and worlds when I was a kid.
  3. How does Roblox exploit people any differently than, say, Atari, who made games deliberately with the intention of them being as addictive as possible, to encourage kids to carry on putting coins into them? This is a genuine question, I know very little about Roblox.
  4. A sad day, if not an entirely unexpected thing to happen, I think everyone knew he'd been ill for a long time .The man who is (possibly) responsible for more of us being here (posting on a gaming forum in our middle age) than anyone else. https://www.theguardian.com/technology/2021/sep/16/home-computing-pioneer-sir-clive-sinclair-dies-aged-81
  5. Think it's The Courtyard, which was an adaptation of a prose story he wrote for some collection of Lovecraft inspired short stories. I really liked Providence. Seem to remember it got dissed a bit on here when it was being released. But there's a lot of depth to it.
  6. Did you cover the "darker" aspects of it? The assault charges, far-right and fetishist stuff? To be honest I think it would make a great David Lynch film, let alone a GamesTM article.
  7. Can't exactly see how old that article is, but I'm sure it's quite old, as I am certain I remember reading it a few years back when I was digging into this stuff again.(A couple of years after I made my first post in this thread in 2015). It's a fascinating story because I'd always had a vague memory of reading about the strange games company that styled itself as a Victorian school for girls, back in the 80s. It was all very mysterious and unexplained back then. But over the years bits and pieces have leaked out as people have spoken about their own memories and experiences. Now we can pretty much put the whole story together and it certainly isn't all pleasant. There's more of it than is covered in that article by the way, and there are (or at least, there were) some interesting YouTube videos out there, that show a bit more of the activities that we're going on. There's also a private online community somewhere (or at least, there was - this was all stuff I found a few years ago) that seems to be the same people/person up to their old tricks.
  8. Did they ever fix this so that there's actually a peril to your settlements? I spent hours building mine up and creating a wasteland fortress where my little guys could happily farm and live. Bristling with guards and gun emplacements so they were safe. But I don't think it ever once got attacked. Dunno if it's just because I built at Sanctuary and that's a safe area? But I remember thinking the whole base building thing (which I loved anyway) would have been so much better if your settlements were coming under attack from increasingly strong waves of enemies, as the quest moved forward.
  9. I have no idea about any of that stuff you said but that thing in your pictures looks amazing.
  10. Living inland in the UK was a bit of a bad hand to be dealt if you were a kid who loved arcades in the 80s and 90s. Although for some reason the top floor of our Debenhams had a whole load of cabinets, in a little dedicated area next to the bit where they sold games (a Silica concession, I seem to remember). There was also another little place in Ipswich, that I only found a couple of times ... Down one of the side roads not far from the old Odeon. This one was more like a proper arcade but it was very small. I remember seeing a lot of Neo Geo games in there, which you didn't otherwise often see in this country. Anyone else remember it? I seem to remember it was an actual dedicated arcade, rather than a business that was meant for something else but also had some arcade games there. I lived nearer Colchester, which was even worse than Ipswich for arcades. There were a few in the cinema, and also at Rollerworld (which was the main reason I got excited about going there). There was also another place, on Queen Street, which was really a fruit machine place (a very dark and dingy one). But if you went through a door at the back you found a little storage-sized room with four or five arcade games, where we spent many happy hours playing Point Blank and Sega Rally. We weren't supposed to be allowed in as it was 18+ but the attendant never cared because we clearly weren't interested in the fruities. Thankfully we had several trips each year to Eastbourne or Brighton for me to feed my coin-pushing habit.
  11. I will let you have that one. Also Fury Road as others mentioned. You've got to admit it's pretty rare.
  12. Dunno why anyone is even debating whether it will be good or bad. Has there ever been a fourth movie in any franchise that was good? Has there ever been a new addition to a movie series released 20 years after the original that was any good? Were any of the other Matrix sequels able to do anything other than just churn out more of the same of what people liked in the first movie (gun fights and fancy camera tricks mixed with some heavy-handed philosophy). The answer to all those questions is no, by the way. And no Matrix 4 won't be a good film. It might, however, be a passably enjoyable film, for people who are entertained by this sort of thing. Having said that, I rewatched the original trilogy recently (didn't quite make it to the end of the third one) and I found the action scenes mostly very boring. Particularly the scene with Neo fighting hundreds of Smiths.. It goes on for ever and is so repetitive. I seem to remember thinking that when I saw it for the first time at the cinema, too.
  13. I sort of assumed it was the main questline because
  14. Has anyone finished the last mission in the main questline -
  15. Anything on the internet that starts with "a friend..." is blatantly fake.
  16. They were never scary because they had that stupid rule about not attacking unless they sensed a threat. And sometimes their bar for that was pretty high, like "hmm, some humans, the only species we've ever encountered that make a half decent job of resisting us, have teleported onto our cube. And they're planting bombs in our warp core room. Oh well, never mind."
  17. Missile Command Recharged is really good on Android. Will definitely give this a look.
  18. Now I am really excited about this. That sounds great. Almost like it's going to be lots of mini Souls worlds strung together by the open world, which is a totally different experience. One other thing I took from it is that it sounds like it's going to be a dead world again, so there won't be any living cities to explore. Which I've always thought I'd like to see for a change in a Souls game. But he does mention that at one point an NPC approaches you - which sounds like a first. As everyone else in Soulsbourne Universe stands or sits still until you approach them, if they aren't trying to kill you. I guess he could have been describing something that happens in a cut-scene, but I don't think he said so.
  19. Wolfenstein was another big one, I guess. If you saw that running on a VGA 286 you knew you weren't going to see anything like it on the Amiga .
  20. That was definitely a big one for me too.
  21. What someone is willing to pay for something is literally the definition of financial worth, though. The thing is, once it's been paid for, then it technically becomes worth whatever the next person is willing to pay for it.
  22. Not sure about that. I wasn't that bothered by the Mega Drive at the time, or probably at all until something like Mortal Kombat really showed up the difference, in a game I wanted to play. It was definitely more PC games, in 92 - 93, that made me feel like the Amiga was falling behind. Stuff like Wing Commander 2 and Ultima Underworld.
  23. Hmm, okay. Of course there is no legally defined "golden age". Or anything that there is a general consensus on being a golden age, like there is with say the golden age of Hollywood or golden age of comics. I call the years from 90-93 (the years that I was active as an Amiga owner) the "Age of Legends." It is the time when the Amiga's most fondly remembered games came out. Bitmap Bros, Sensible Software, Team 17 etc. The previous era I call the Golden Age because it was the time when the Amiga was miles better than anything else, and if you had one, you were playing the most impressive version of a game available. And every other machine owner was looking at you in envy. The turning point between the ages is just after the release of Shadow Of The Beast - when UK/European developers started to realise they could do more than just make 8-bit "arcade adventure" games with flashy graphics. But if you disagree with my nomenclature, I will from henceforth refer to the earlier period (87 - 89 ish) as the Mythic Age.
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