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FishyFish

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  1. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    Shot with a Canon Sure Shot Telemax 35mm compact on Ilford XP2. FILM - Nearly there by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr FILM - Commuting by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr FILM - Travellers by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr
  2. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    Telling you what it thinks?
  3. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    Hope cement works by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr
  4. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    Do you mean the marks under the man's nose in this image? Like a rainbow / oil-spill type pattern? Those are Newton's Rings. They're caused when the negative touches the glass of the scanner. If you're using an Epson scanner, you'll probably have a thin plastic insert that goes with the 120 film holder. You can use that to keep the negs flat so they don't touch the glass. It does the job but is a bit of a faff though, and means you can't scan as many frames at once.
  5. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    Thise are all nice @Scratchy Bollock, but the tube-train interior is especially lovely.
  6. John Cusack has been cast along with Rainn Wilson and Sasha Lane. https://www.radiotimes.com/news/on-demand/2019-04-17/john-cusack-to-star-in-amazon-remake-of-channel-4s-utopia/
  7. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    I'm off to Barcelona for a few days later in the summer, so I'll be sure to drag my wife in there.
  8. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    One from the Yashica Mat 124 G on some expired Shanghai GP3 film. I've cropped it to 6 x 4.5 ratio as there was just too much empty blue (grey) sky at the top of the 6 x 6 version. FILM - Little house, big sky by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr
  9. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    The second shot might work well as a square crop with the black post splitting it in two.
  10. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    Lovely. The film will probably still be usable, but it's likely to have degraded, so you might get additional grain and, if it's a colour film, colour shifts or other defects in the film emulsion. How it's been stored will have an effect. If it's been in cool dark conditions then it'll have less of an effect than if it's been somewhere warm. The film speed will also have an effect - slower films will degrade more slowly than faster, higher ASA films. You might also get marks on the negatives where the film's been positioned on the film rollers for an extended period of time. I'd shoot it and get it developed, both to see what shots are already on there (even if they come out a bit shonky) and to just finish the roll off - sometimes the effects of expired film can be really pleasing (and sometimes it looks barely any different to fresh film). The general rule of thumb with expired film is to overexpose it by a stop for every decade of expiry (or half-a-stop for black and white film) so, for example, if it contains 400asa colour film that was bought around 2010, I'd meter it as though it was 200asa (maybe even 160asa) but get it developed as though it was normal 400asa film. Goog luck and let us see the results!
  11. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    Yashica Mat 124 G Shanghai GP3 FILM - The forbidden path by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr
  12. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    A few more from the Hepworth gallery. FILM - Hepworth by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr FILM - An arc in the sky by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr FILM - In step by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr FILM - Howden by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr
  13. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    Nikon F80 Nikkor 28-80mm f/3.5-5.6 Arista Edu 200 film FILM - Day-lights by fishyfish_arcade, on Flickr
  14. FishyFish

    The Rllmuk Photography Thread

    I'd definitely give the Rolleiflex a go. Those are lovely pieces of kit. I get my film lab processed and then scan it at home (except for colour, which I get scans of too), but it's a simple enough process to develop your own and the equipment and chemicals are readily available. The Talk Photography forum has a film sub-forum that is a great place for advice (e.g. here), and there are tons of websites and Youtube tutorials too. I use Peak Imaging for processing my black and white stuff. They're a good lab (and I have the benefit of being in walking distance, so can drop off and pick up in person). Filmdev are good too and pretty cost effective for processing and scans (I send my colour stuff there, only because Peak are a bit expensive for scans). There are lots of other places too, even Max Spielmann and the like (although I had poor results when I used my local branch).
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